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iStock/Thinkstock(SEOUL) -- North Korea launched what appears to be a short range SCUD missile that flew about 280 miles into the Sea of Japan on Sunday, according to the South Korean military and U.S. officials. The launch was the ninth missile test conducted by North Korea this year.

"U.S. Pacific Command detected and tracked what we assess was a North Korean missile launch at 10:40 a.m. Hawaii time May 28," said a statement from U.S. Pacific Command. "The launch of a short range ballistic missile occurred near Wonsan Airfield.

"The missile was tracked for six minutes until it landed in the Sea of Japan," said the statement.

"We are working with our Interagency partners on a more detailed assessment. We continue to monitor North Korea's actions closely, " the statement continued.

"It is assumed to be a SCUD missile. The missile flew 450 km (280 miles) and more details are now being analyzed," the South Korean military said. A U.S. defense official also said the missile appeared to be a short range SCUD missile.

Earlier, the South Korean military said South Korean President Moon had ordered an NSC [National Security Council] meeting to discuss the latest North Korean launch.

The ballistic missile test is the ninth such test conducted this year and marks the third weekend in a row that North Korea has launched a missile.

President Trump was briefed on the latest North Korean launch, a spokesman for the National Security Council said.

Japan's Defense Ministry reported it was possible that the North Korean missile may have landed in the Sea of Japan inside Japan's economic exclusion zone, which stretches 200 miles from its shoreline.

On March 5, North Korea fired four SCUD missiles that traveled more than 600 miles into the Sea of Japan, and three of them landed in Japan's economic exclusion zone.

Short range SCUD missiles are not a concern to U.S. officials, given that they are based on a Soviet-era technology that is decades old.

However, North Korea's two most recent missile tests have demonstrated significant progress of its missile program. North Korea has openly stated that it is seeking to develop a long-range missile armed with a nuclear warhead capable of striking the continental United States.

On May 14, North Korea fired what the U.S. calls a KN-17 medium range missile that reached an unprecedented altitude of 2,000 kilometers (1,245 miles). That launch demonstrated that the missile could probably travel a similar distance horizontally.

On May 21, North Korea successfully launched a KN-15 solid fueled missile that flew more than 300 miles into the Sea of Japan. That missile launch has raised concerns because solid-fueled missiles are more stable than liquid-fueled missiles and can be fired on short notice.

"We always assume that, with a testing program, they get better with each test," Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said in an appearance on CBS' "Face the Nation."

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SVEN HOPPE/AFP/Getty Images(MUNICH) -- German Chancellor Angela Merkel told an election rally in Munich that Europe "must take its fate into its own hands," pointing to potential differences of opinion with the United States and Great Britain, following the Group of Seven summit in Italy.

"The times when we could completely count on others, they are over to a certain extent," Merkel said on Sunday. "I have experienced this in the last few days. And that is why I can only say that we Europeans must really take our fate into our own hands."

Merkel affirmed her country's friendship with the U.S. and the United Kingdom, but suggested that Europeans should fight for their own destiny.

"Of course [we are] in friendship with the United States of America, in friendship with Great Britain and as good neighbors wherever that is possible also with other countries, even with Russia," she said. "But we have to know that we must fight for our future on our own, for our destiny as Europeans, and that's what I want to do together with you."

Great Britain and America both experienced shifts in leadership and direction since last year. The U.K. is now preparing to leave the European Union following the Brexit referendum in June 2016.

In the U.S., President Trump's election cast doubt the future on the country's continued participation in the Paris climate accord. Trump's support of NATO has been less full-throated and unqualified than his predecessors.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- If President Trump decides to pull out of the 2015 Paris accord on climate change, the United States could become one of only three nations in a U.N. climate group not to be signed onto the deal.

Trump announced in a tweet Saturday that he would make his "final decision" this week on whether or not to keep the U.S. in the landmark accord in which nations agreed to work toward curbing greenhouse gas emissions to address climate change.

"I will make my final decision on the Paris Accord next week!" the president wrote.

I will make my final decision on the Paris Accord next week!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 27, 2017

The president's tweet came after meetings with other world leaders who pushed for the U.S. to remain in the Paris agreement.

“There is one open question, which is the U.S. position on the Paris climate accords," Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni said at the Group of Seven summit in Italy on Friday. "All others have confirmed their total agreement on the accord.”

Trump was also asked by Pope Francis at the Vatican last week to keep the U.S. in the climate change accord.

The December 2015 deal has as of this month been signed by all 197 countries in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change except two: Syria and Nicaragua. Of the 195 that have signed, 147 have ratified the accord.

If the U.S. pulls out of the Paris deal, it would become the largest producer of greenhouse gas emissions not included in the agreement, according to EPA data.

Trump has at times seemed to downplay concerns over climate change.

As a candidate on Dec. 1, 2015, Trump posted a video on Instagram -- while the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference was taking place -- in which he criticized then-President Obama for "worrying about global warming."

"What a ridiculous situation," Trump said in the post.

Trump's chief economic adviser, Gary Cohn, told reporters at the G-7 summit Friday that the president was growing more attuned to the European stance on climate change.

"I think he is learning to understand the European position,” Cohn said when asked which way the president was leaning on the Paris agreement. “Look, as you know from the U.S., there's very strong views on both sides.”

“He came here to learn,” Cohn said at the summit. “So his views are evolving, which is exactly what they should be.”

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images(MANCHESTER, England) -- Another man has been arrested in connection with the Manchester bombing on Sunday, according to police, bringing the total number of men held in custody following the attack to 12.

Greater Manchester Police said a 25-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of terrorist activity.

The police noted that 14 people have been arrested since a suspected suicide bombing killed 22 people at an Ariana Grande concert at Manchester Arena on Monday night.

Two of those people have been released. The suspected bomber, who also died in the attack, is Salman Abedi.

Latest update. pic.twitter.com/Q1EvKmVOPB

— G M Police (@gmpolice) May 28, 2017

Britain's top counterterrorism police officer, Assistant Commissioner Mark Rowley, said in a statement Friday that police have made "significant arrests and finds" in the investigation of the attack, claiming they had gotten "hold of a large part" of an alleged network of Abedi's.

"We are focusing on understanding Abedi's life; forensically examining a number of scenes; reviewing hours of CCTV from the night itself and the hours before; financial work; communication; digital exhibits; the accounts from hundreds of witnesses; and, of course, enquiries internationally," Rowley said in the statement.

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Getty Images(JERUSALEM) -- The leader of the Jewish state sent Ramadan greetings to its Muslim citizens Saturday.

"I wish #Ramadan Kareem to Israel's Muslim citizens and Muslims around the world, hoping for much needed brotherhood, mutual respect & peace," tweeted Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

I wish #Ramadan Kareem to Israel's Muslim citizens and Muslims around the world, hoping for much needed brotherhood, mutual respect & peace.

— PM of Israel (@IsraeliPM) May 27, 2017

"Ramadan Kareem" means "have a generous Ramadan."

Netanyahu also tweeted his well wishes in Arabic.

أهنئ مواطني إسرائيل المسلمين والمسلمين عموما بمناسبة حلول شهر #رمضان آملا بتحقيق الأخوة والاحترام المتبادل والسلام. كل عام وأنتم بخير.

— بنيامين نتنياهو (@Israelipm_ar) May 27, 2017

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic lunar calendar, and is observed by Muslims worldwide as a month of fasting to commemorate the first revelation of the Quran to Muhammad, according to Islamic belief. Muslims are expected not to eat or drink during daylight hours, including water and medicine. Faithful people may also avoid smoking and sex.

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Getty Images(LONDON) -- Former President Barack Obama made a princely pit stop Saturday at Kensington Palace.
"Good to see my friend Prince Harry in London to discuss the work of our foundations & offer condolences to victims of the Manchester attack," Obama tweeted. 

 

Good to see my friend Prince Harry in London to discuss the work of our foundations & offer condolences to victims of the Manchester attack. https://t.co/7azv4BV2Nt

— Barack Obama (@BarackObama) May 27, 2017

The palace tweeted that Prince Harry hosted the 44th president of the U.S., explaining "they discussed support for veterans, mental health, conservation, empowering young people and the work of their respective foundations."

Obama's relationship with the royals has solidified over the years. In 2011, newlyweds Prince William and Kate Middleton met the Obamas at Buckingham Palace as their first public engagement together. And a few years later, William visited the White House, where he and the then-president discussed illegal wildlife trafficking.

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Greater Manchester Police(MANCHESTER, England) -- Greater Manchester Police has released CCTV images of suicide bomber Salman Abedi from the night of the deadly attack at Manchester Arena.

In a statement, police said 14 locations are still being searched in connection with the investigation and at least 13 people have been arrested.

"The investigation is making good progress and we know one of the last places Abedi went was a city centre flat and from there he left to make his way to the Manchester Arena," Greater Manchester Police said.

Twenty-two people were killed in the attack on Monday night, including seven children.

On Saturday morning, British Prime Minister Theresa May announced the U.K. threat level was lowered from critical to severe. According to BBC, May said significant police activity in the last 24 hours led to the decision to reduce the level.

Greater Manchester Police said around 1,000 people are involved in the investigation and hundreds of officers are involved in security around Greater Manchester.

"This is still a live investigation which is not slowing down," police said. "Our priorities are to understand the run up to this terrible event and to understand if more people were involved in planning this attack."

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Mandel Ngan/Getty Images(SICILY, Italy) -- President Trump, addressing U.S. troops at Sigonella Naval Air Station in Italy in the final event of his first foreign trip, called his international tour a "home run.”

“I think we hit a home run no matter where we are,” the president said.

He again said money is pouring into NATO, though he did not offer details on any specific new commitments that have been made by NATO countries. He also reiterated the U.S. commitment to the North Atlantic alliance.

“Money is actually starting to pour into NATO from countries that would not have been doing what they're doing now had I not been elected, I can tell you that,” the president said. "We are behind NATO all the way. All of us will be more safe and secure if everyone fulfills their obligations the way they're supposed to, right?”

Reflecting upon the G7 summit over the last two days, the president said it was "productive."

“It was a tremendously productive meeting where I strengthened America's bonds. We have great bonds with other countries. We concluded a historic week for our country,” he said.

The president also expressed optimism about the Israeli-Palestinian peace process, recalling his visit to Israel and his meeting with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas in Bethlehem, a city he noted is “so precious to so many.”

“[Abbas] assured me he's willing to reach for peace with Israel in good faith, and I believe he will. And Israeli [Prime Minister] Benjamin Netanyahu -- he assured me that he's ready to reach for peace. He's a friend of mine, and he means it,” he said.

At one point during the speech, the president seemed to be referencing the sound of an approaching helicopter and pondered aloud about who it was -- again mispronouncing Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s name in speculating it could be him or “Justin from Canada,” an apparent reference to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

The president thanked the troops and their families for their service to the country and vowed that the U.S. will “win” the fight against terrorism.

“Terrorism is a threat. Bad threat," he said. "Together we'll overcome this threat. We'll win.”

First lady Melania Trump introduced the president to the troops, telling the crowd that it has been a “very special” trip for her and a success for her husband in his role as president.

“We had a great time here. We did a lot of great stuff,” she said. “My husband worked very hard on behalf of our country. I am very proud of him. This trip has also been incredible for me as first lady.”

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images(TAORMINA, Italy) -- President Trump, coming off a G7 summit and meeting at the Vatican where he was pushed for the U.S. to stay in the Paris climate agreement, tweeted Saturday that he will make a decision next week.

 

I will make my final decision on the Paris Accord next week!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 27, 2017


The future of the United States’ involvement in the landmark agreement, which Trump repeatedly criticized as a candidate, was a sticking point at the G7 summit in Italy that ended on Saturday, with the Italian prime minister pointing to it as an "open question" at the end of the summit's first day on Friday.

“There is one open question, which is the U.S. position on the Paris climate accords. … All others have confirmed their total agreement on the accord,” Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni said. “We are sure that after an internal reflection, the United States will also want to commit to it.”

In addition to getting pushed on the topic at the G7 summit, the president also got an earful at the Vatican, where the pope presented Trump with one of his writings on the environment and the Cardinal secretary of state further raised the issue during a bilateral meeting.

Though the president has yet to make a final decision, his chief economic adviser, Gary Cohn, indicated Friday that the president was growing more attuned to the European stance on the issue.

"I think he is leaning to understand the European position,” Cohn said when asked which way the president was leaning. “Look, as you know from the U.S., there's very strong views on both sides.”

Cohn told reporters the president's views on the Paris climate agreement are “evolving.”

“He came here to learn,” Cohn said at the G7 summit. “So his views are evolving, which is exactly what they should be.”

The president’s national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, chimed in to say that the president’s decision about whether to remain in the agreement would ultimately be based on what’s best for the United States, to which Cohn concurred.

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Jonathan Ernst/Getty Images(TAORMINA, Italy) -- President Trump’s national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, repeatedly declined to answer media questions about reports that the president's son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner, sought backchannel communications with Russia prior to Trump's taking office. But McMaster said, “generally speaking,” he would not be concerned about such an action.

“It’s not something that I've in any way been involved with or have any knowledge of,” McMaster said at a press briefing in Italy of the revelation that Kushner talked about communications in his discussion with Russia’s U.S. ambassador in December.

Asked whether he would be concerned as a general matter if someone in the administration or National Security Council sought backchannel communications with the Russian embassy, McMaster said he would not.

“No, we have backchannel communications with a number of countries. So, generally speaking about backchannel communications, what that allows you to do is to communicate in a discreet manner,” McMaster said.

Pressed in a follow-up question about whether he has any concerns at all about Kushner's talking to the Russian ambassador about setting up such communications, McMaster stayed silent and simply did not respond.

Backchanneling is a practice at times used by government officials, but Kushner was not yet a government employee at the time of his contact with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak in December.

Another senior administration official, Chief Economic Adviser Gary Cohn, said the topic of Kushner and his relationship to Russia was not raised at the G7 summit in Italy, which ended on Saturday.

"Never came up," Cohn said when asked if the subject were discussed.

He also said issues around Russia, while discussed at the G7, were not raised in any of the president’s bilateral meetings.

"Russia as a country came up a lot. It was part of the communique; it was discussed many times, Russia as a country," Cohn said. "Russia never came up in the bilaterals.”

Trump held no press conferences on trip

Asked about the absence of any press conferences by Trump during the trip, Cohn said the president has been very busy with a “robust schedule” and that he has “worked nonstop.”

When reporters said other world leaders are making time to hold press briefings, Cohn said, “I don’t know that that’s true.”

Paris climate deal

Cohn, asked to explain his comment Friday that the president’s view on the Paris climate accords is evolving, said Trump is “continuously talking to people about the issue to gain more knowledge about the issue.”

'Amazing deals'

Speaking broadly speaking about Trump's foreign trip, Cohn said the “the president was able to make some of the most amazing deals that have been made by an administration ever.”

Cohn specifically cited the arms deal and private business deals announced in Saudi Arabia, saying they amount to close to a half-trillion dollars and that he’s never seen so many deals come together at once.

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ABC News(MANCHESTER, England) -- British police made two more arrests early Saturday in connection to Monday's terror attack at a crowded concert hall in Manchester that killed 22 people.

Officers executed a search warrant and used a controlled explosion to gain entry to an address where two men -- ages 22 and 20 -- were arrested.

A total of 13 people have been arrested in the terror investigation, two of whom have been released without charge, the Greater Manchester police said.

Eleven people remain in custody in connection with Monday night's suicide bombing at Manchester Arena, where American singer Ariana Grande had just finished performing.

The ages of the detained men range from 18 to 38, police said.

On Friday, the police said a man was arrested in Moss Side, an impoverished neighborhood nestled south of Manchester city center.

The Friday-evening arrest targeted a 44-year-old man in the Rusholme area who was taken into custody on suspicions related to the attack.

Authorities have said Salman Abedi, the 22-year-old suspected suicide bomber who died in the explosion, grew up in an area near Moss Side.

There are 12 locations police are continuing to search and police activity will continue throughout the weekend, according to Greater Manchester Police Chief Constable Ian Hopkins. Manchester Arena is still cordoned off.

Britain's top counter-terrorism police officer, Assistant Commissioner Mark Rowley, said in a statement that police have made "significant arrests and finds" in the investigation, adding that they had gotten "hold of a large part" of Abedi's network.

"We are focusing on understanding Abedi's life; forensically examining a number of scenes; reviewing hours of CCTV from the night itself and the hours before; financial work; communication; digital exhibits; the accounts from hundreds of witnesses; and, of course, enquiries internationally," Rowley said.

Rowley said "immense" progress has been made and that more arrests are likely.

"It has been a challenging week, and we are still in the middle of a live investigation," Hopkins said in a statement on Friday. "We have hundreds of officers that are working on this investigation from across the national counterterrorism policing network, and we have seized thousands of exhibits that are now being assessed."

A senior security source told BBC News that the threat level was raised to "critical" partly because of concern about the possibility of copy-cat attacks.

Manchester police said they have seen an increase in reports of hate incidents this week, from 28 on Monday -- which Hopkins said is what they receive on an average day -- to 56 on Wednesday.

"We can't directly link these to the events of Monday night and are continuing to monitor the situation," he said.

In addition to those killed, 116 people have been treated for injuries from Monday's attack and 75 were hospitalized, including 23 patients who are currently in critical care, according to the National Health Service in England.

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Jonathan Ernst/Getty Images(TAORMINA, Italy) -- Before President Trump boards Air Force One on Saturday, he is concluding his whirlwind eight-day trip overseas at the Group of Seven, or G7, summit in Taormina, Italy.

His agenda includes discussions about emerging markets and global issues, specifically migration, food security and gender. He will be seated between the leaders of Niger and Tunisia, according to White House Chief Economic Adviser Gary Cohn.

Trump tweeted Saturday morning, "Big G7 meetings today. Lots of very important matters under discussion. First on the list, of course, is terrorism. #G7Taormina."

The president then tweeted, "Many NATO countries have agreed to step up payments considerably, as they should. Money is beginning to pour in -- NATO will be much stronger."

Big G7 meetings today. Lots of very important matters under discussion. First on the list, of course, is terrorism. #G7Taormina

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 27, 2017

Many NATO countries have agreed to step up payments considerably, as they should. Money is beginning to pour in- NATO will be much stronger.

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 27, 2017

This tweet comes after Trump lectured member countries on payments at NATO headquarters on Thursday, where he said that 2 percent of a country's GDP is the minimum in terms of necessary contributions.

Trump's third and final session at the summit will be a closed meeting with seven heads of state.

The annual event brings together the leaders of the United States, France, the United Kingdom, Japan, Italy and Canada to discuss and promote solutions for major world issues.

On Friday, Trump sat down with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to discuss North Korea, among other issues.

"It's a big problem. It's a world problem," the president said. "It will be solved at some point. It will be solved -- you can bet on that."

Just before departing for Washington, D.C., Trump will speak to American and allied servicemen and their families, recapping highlights and accomplishments of the trip.

Trump took to Twitter on Friday to say that the trip has been "very successful" and that the United States has made and saved "billions of dollars and millions of jobs."

"Any improvement on trade would save untold numbers of jobs. Stopping even one bad trade deal can save millions. Changing the infrastructure of global trade to tilt it back toward the U.S. would save and create millions, easily," a White House official said, explaining the president's tweet. "This is, of course, in addition to all of the jobs from the deals made in Saudi Arabia."

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iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) -- British Prime Minister Theresa May said Saturday morning that the country's terrorism threat level has been reduced from its top level of "critical" to "severe."

The change indicates an attack is highly likely but not imminently expected.

The level was raised to "critical" after Monday's bomb attack at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, which left 22 people dead.

May cited progress in the investigation for the change in threat level, but urged people to remain vigilant.

Following May's announcement, London Mayor Sadiq Khan tweeted, "Security plans will remain in place this weekend -- including additional policing for major events and the army helping with police guarding duties."

Khan continued, "I encourage all Londoners to remain vigilant and report anything suspicious to the police."

The national threat level for terrorism has now been reduced from 'critical' to 'severe'. Security plans will remain in place this weekend. pic.twitter.com/lvgFMpRlCh

— Sadiq Khan (@SadiqKhan) May 27, 2017

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iStock/Thinkstock(CAIRO) -- Masked gunmen opened fire on a bus carrying Coptic Christians in central Egypt on Friday, killing at least 28 people and wounding another 25 people, according to BBC.

No group immediately claimed responsibility. Coptic Christians make up just 10 percent of Egypt's population of 92 million.

Last month, ISIS claimed responsibility for attacks on Coptic churches on Palm Sunday in which 49 people were killed.

President Donald Trump condemned the attacks on Friday and said the U.S. stands in solidarity with Egypt.

"Terrorists are engaged in a war against civilization, and it is up to all who value life to confront and defeat this evil," Trump said. "This merciless slaughter of Christians in Egypt tears at our hearts and grieves our souls. Wherever innocent blood is spilled, a wound is inflicted upon humanity."

Trump said the attack "steels our resolve to bring nations together for the righteous purpose of crushing the evil organization of terror, and exposing their depraved, twisted and thuggish ideology."

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The Pentagon's Missile Defense Agency will conduct its first-ever intercept test of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) next week, a nod to the growing threat from North Korea.

The test, scheduled for Tuesday, will involve launching an ICBM-class target from the Reagan Test Site on Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands and a ground-based interceptor from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

If successful, the "kill vehicle" or intercept will collide with the ICBM test target mid-course over the Pacific Ocean. This is different than the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system located in South Korea which would intercept the kill vehicle at a lower altitude in the missile's terminal stage.

This will be the 18th test of the ground-based interceptor. The last one, in June 2014, was the first success since 2008. The system is nine for 17 since 1999 with other types of target missiles. An ICBM target has never been tested before.

There are 32 ground-based interceptors at Fort Greely, Alaska and four at Vandenberg.

The Missile Defense Agency said in its FY2018 Budget Overview that it would deploy eight additional ground-based interceptors in Alaska by the end of 2017, for a total of 44 overall "to improve protection against North Korean and potential Iranian ICBM threats as they emerge."

The U.S. tests its ICBMs about twice every year. Earlier this month, Air Force Global Strike Command test launched an unarmed Minuteman III ICBM equipped with a single test reentry vehicle from Vandenberg. The reentry vehicle landed 4,200 miles away to the Kwajalein Atoll.

"These test launches verify the accuracy and reliability of the ICBM weapon system, providing valuable data to ensure a continued safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent," the Air Force Global Strike Command said in a statement.

North Korea has spent the last decade working to develop an ICBM capable of reaching the continental United States. Though the country has conducted eight missiles tests thus far in 2017, none have proven to be an ICBM.

The last test North Korea conducted on May 21 was the successful launch of a KN-15 medium range ballistic missile that traveled just over 300 miles into the Sea of Japan.

But one week earlier, North Korea tested a KN-17 medium range ballistic missile, the first successful launch of its kind for the nation.

The Japanese Defense Minister Tomomi Inada told reporters that the missile reached an unprecedented altitude of 1,245 miles. Experts claim the missile would have flown a much greater distance if launched on a maximum trajectory, perhaps reaching military bases in Guam.

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