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Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(MANCHESTER, England) — The brother of Salman Abedi, the suspect accused of carrying out a bombing in Manchester, England, that killed 22 people, allegedly said he knew his brother was going to carry out an attack, but did not know where or when, according to a spokesman for Libya’s counterterror forces.

Abedi, 22, the suspected suicide bomber, died at the scene of Monday night's attack at an Ariana Grande concert.

Authorities found what was described to ABC News as a bomb-making workshop in Abedi’s home in Manchester, with enough chemicals to build additional bombs.

 Libyan authorities had been following Hashem Abedi, the suspect’s brother who was born 1997, for a month and a half because of suspected links to ISIS, said Ahmed Dagdoug, the spokesman for Libya’s counterterror forces.

The two brothers were close, and Dagdoug said that Salman placed a call to Hashem, as well as their mother, 30 minutes before carrying out the attack.

On Tuesday, that brother was detained in Libya. During interrogation, Hashem Abedi revealed that he knew his brother was going to carry out an attack, but he did not know where or when, Dagdoug said.

Dagdoug said Hashem Abedi also revealed that he knew exactly how the bomb was made, and that he believes that Salman created the device by himself. He said that he provided some assistance to his brother, but added no specific details as to what that was.

Dagdoug said a network was involved in planning the attack.

The brothers came to Libya on April 18 and Salman Abedi departed on May 17, Dagdoug said.

It’s not clear at this time if Salman went to Syria, Dagdoug said.

Salman Abedi's father, Ramadan Abedi, was also arrested in Libya.

Dagdoug told ABC News that the two brothers do consider themselves to be members of ISIS and said that they had been studying ISIS videos online, including instructional videos that teach the viewer how to make a bomb.

 Another one of the suspect's brothers, 23-year-old Ismail Abedi, was arrested in Manchester, a security official confirmed to ABC News.

A total of seven people are in custody in Britain in connection with the attack. Under British law, a person can be taken into custody in a terrorism investigation and held up to 14 days without being charged.

Chief Constable Ian Hopkins of the Greater Manchester Police said today, "This is clearly a network that we are investigating, and extensive activity is taking place across Greater Manchester as we speak."

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May Tuesday raised the country's threat level to critical -- the highest of the United Kingdom's five threat levels -- indicating that another attack may be imminent.

 The U.K. Metropolitan Police said 1,000 additional armed officers have been freed up to carry out patrols across the U.K.

"The extra officers add to a wider policing plan which sees increased patrolling at crowded places, iconic sites and transport hubs as police and partners do everything they can to protect the public," the police said.

 Twenty-two people, including a female police officer who was off duty, were killed in the Monday night explosion. ISIS has claimed responsibility for the bombing.

Witness Joseph Harries told ABC News' "Good Morning America" that "people were just trying to get out of the arena as fast as they possibly could after the blast. I was directly in front of the stage at the heart of the arena. I had exactly the same distance to get out of any of the doors."

 "I had my best friend with me, and I grabbed hold of her wrist and told her never let go of me," he said. "We just ran. We jumped over chairs, railings to get out of the doors. We had to force open doors that wouldn't open because people were trying to get to -- the entire capacity of the 20,000-person arena were trying to get out of one exit.

"It felt like an eternity," Harries added, but it "couldn't have been more than two, three minutes from in our seats to outside of the arena."

Officials said that 119 people went to hospitals after the bombing, 64 of them are being treated and 20 of those are in critical condition.

 Saffie Rose Roussos, 8, is the youngest known person who died from the attack. She was separated from her mother and sister, who were among the wounded, police said.

Fifteen-year-old Olivia Campbell was also among those killed, Campbell's mother wrote on Facebook.

Runshaw College in Lancashire confirmed on its Facebook page that 18-year-old student Georgina Bethany Callander died in the attack.

 Lisa Lees, a 43-year-old mother and grandmother, was confirmed to be among the dead by her daughter, Lauren Ashleigh Lees.

"My mum was an amazing lady and wife," her daughter said in a statement. "We will pull together as a family and help each other through the darkness."

Another victim was Nell Jones, who was in Year 9 at the Holmes Chapel Comprehensive School & Sixth Form College in Holmes Chapel, England.

"Nell’s family have been searching for her since the incident in the hope that they would find her being cared for in hospital. Unfortunately, the police have now confirmed that Nell died at the scene," the school headmaster, Denis Oliver, said in a statement. "We are all devastated by the loss and as a school community we must now come to terms with what has happened."

A sixth victim was identified as Martyn Hett, according to his employer at Rumpus PR.

“We are all distraught at the tragic loss of our much-loved, larger than life, colourful and charismatic colleague Martyn Hett," Rumpus PR Managing Director Paul Evans said in a statement. "Martyn was an upbeat and positive soul who saw the good, the joy, the fun in everything.

"At work, he was the consummate professional. A master of his subject -- he was a talented writer, creative thinker and social media expert," Evans added. "Martyn loved life and I hope his lasting legacy is that people -- in these dreadful times -- choose to live their lives with joy not hate, just like he did.”

Two more victims were identified as Chloe Rutherford, 17, and Liam Curry, 19. "On the night our daughter Chloe died and our son Liam died, their wings were ready by our hearts were not," the families said in a statement posted on the Greater Manchester Police Twitter account.

A school receptionist, Jane Tweddle, was also killed in the attack. "Jane was a well-loved member of staff and our thoughts are with her friends and family at this terrible time," Jane Bailey, principal of South Shore Academy, said in a statement. "We have received numerous messages of condolences from parents, students, community members and colleagues across Blackpool for which we are very grateful. All of them say the same things about our lovely Jane ... bubbly, kind, welcoming, funny, generous ... the list goes on."

And Allerton High School in Leeds confirmed that student Sorrell Leczkowski was killed, as well. "Sorrell was a delightful member of the school community," read a statement from the school. "She enjoyed her studies, had a lovely group of friends and was a real asset to Allerton High School."

 On Tuesday, May said, "We struggle to comprehend the warped and twisted mind that sees a room packed with young children not as a scene to cherish but as an opportunity for carnage."

A moment of silence was observed today before Manchester United's Europa League final soccer game against Ajax Amsterdam. Manchester beat Amsterdam 2-0 to win the Europa League.

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ABC News(MANCHESTER, England) -- In the wake of a devastating bombing in Manchester that killed at least 22 people at an Ariana Grande concert, officials and parents alike were grappling with the news that many of the injured and killed were young adolescents or children.

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May called the bombing a "sickening attack" that targeted children and young people "who should have been enjoying one of the most memorable nights of their lives."

"We struggle to comprehend the warped and twisted mind that sees a room packed with young children not as a scene to cherished but as an opportunity for carnage," May said Tuesday.

According to the Greater Manchester Health and Social Care, a total of 119 people were taken by ambulance or went to a hospital following Monday night's attack at Manchester Arena. Officials said 64 were being treated as of Wednesday and 20 of them remained in critical condition across Greater Manchester.

At least 12 children under the age of 16 were seriously injured, officials said. An 8-year-old girl who died from her injuries is the youngest known victim in the attack.

Saffie Rose Roussos

Among the dead is Saffie Rose Roussos, described by her teacher as a "beautiful little girl."

Saffie had become separated from her mother and sister during the attack.

Chris Upton, the headteacher at the Tarleton Community Primary School, where Saffie was a student, released a statement calling the girl's death a "tremendous shock."

"I would like to send our deepest condolences to all of her family and friends," Upton said. "The thought that anyone could go out to a concert and not come home is heartbreaking. Saffie was simply a beautiful little girl in every aspect of the word. She was loved by everyone and her warmth and kindness will be remembered fondly. Saffie was quiet and unassuming with a creative flair."

Upton said the school will be calling in specialists to help students and staff cope with Saffie's death.

Georgina Callander

Runshaw College confirmed that the 18-year-old college student was among the victims.

"It is with enormous sadness that it appears that one of the people who lost their lives in Monday’s Manchester attack was one of our students here at Runshaw College," school officials said in a statement posted on Facebook. "Georgina Callander was a former Bishop Rawstorne pupil studying with us on the second year of her Health and Social Care course. Our deepest sympathies, thoughts and prayers go out to all of Georgina’s friends, family, and all of those affected by this loss."

Olivia Campbell

"RIP my darling precious gorgeous girl Olivia Campbell taken far far to soon go sing with the angels and keep smiling mummy loves you so much," Olivia's mother, Charlotte Campbell, wrote on Facebook.

 Prior to learning that her 15-year-old daughter had been killed in the attack, the teen's mother pleaded for the public to help her locate her daughter, telling the BBC, "I’m worried sick. If anybody has seen her please contact the police. Contact somebody let her know you’ve seen her. Even if you think you’ve seen her just let the police know ... We’ve not slept. We’ve got family out looking for her. Please, please somebody must have seen her at some point. Just let me know you’ve seen her. Let the police know, let anybody know you’ve seen her please."

Lisa Lees

The 43-year-old mother and grandmother was also among those killed. One of her daughters, Lauren Ashleigh Lees, described her as "a very elegant person" and "an amazing" mother, grandmother and wife who was "absolutely adored" by everyone around her.

"She cared so much for everybody and did anything for them," Lauren Ashleigh Lees said in a statement. "We will pull together as a family and help each other through the darkness."

Nell Jones

The ninth-grader was confirmed to have died in the attacks by her school, Holmes Chapel Comprehensive and Sixth Form. The girl's family had searched for her after she attended the concert, but the teen died at the scene, according to her school's headteacher Denis Oliver.

"We are all devastated by the loss and as a school community we must now come to terms with what has happened," Oliver said in a statement.

The school plans on bringing in professional support to help teachers and students grieve.

 Nell's form tutor David Wheeler called the teen "always smiling."

“Nell was a very popular girl, always smiling, always positive," Wheeler said in the statement. "Her tutor group have been together since the transition from primary school. It feels like they have lost a sister not a classmate”

Another student at the school, Freya Lewis, was hospitalized after the attack. Her father told the school that the teen is recovering after having been in surgery for over 10 hours.

Martyn Hett

Hett's employer, Rumpus PR, confirmed his death in a statement, calling Hett "larger than life, colourful and charismatic."

Paul Evans, managing director of Rumpus PR, said Hett was a "talented writer, creative thinker and social media expert."

"Words really can’t express how much he will be missed by colleagues and clients alike," Evans said in a statement. "Martyn loved life and I hope his lasting legacy is that people -- in these dreadful times -- choose to live their lives with joy not hate, just like he did."

Chloe Rutherford and Liam Curry

In a statement, the teens' families said, "They were perfect in every way for each other and were meant to be."

"They wanted to be together forever and now they are."

Tribute from the family of Chloe Rutherford, 17, and the family of Liam Curry, 19 pic.twitter.com/nVNf8dS0ZQ

— G M Police (@gmpolice) May 24, 2017


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Franco Origlia/Getty Images(ROME) -- First lady Melania Trump paid a visit to Bambino Gesù children's hospital in Rome on Wednesday, spending her time coloring with patients, snapping selfies, signing bandages and even speaking to them in Italian.

“My visit to Bambino Gesu Children’s Hospital today was very moving," the first lady said in a statement. "To spend time speaking to and coloring with children who have such a positive spirit despite illness was an amazing gift. The time I spent with the little ones in the Intensive Care Unit is something I will never forget, and I will pray for each of them daily. I want to thank the doctors, nurses and staff of the hospital, who all do such beautiful and critical work.”

Trump also shared a moving story about a young boy who was just informed he received a heart transplant, adding that she visited with the boy just hours prior.

“Upon landing in Belgium, I learned a young boy and his family who had been waiting for a heart transplant was informed that the hospital has found a donor," she said. "I read a book and held hands with this special little one just a few hours ago, and now my own heart is filled with joy over this news.”

A little boy who I visited today & had been waiting for a heart transplant will be receiving one! #Blessings #Faith pic.twitter.com/DZU3ojxXVC

— Melania Trump (@FLOTUS) May 24, 2017

The hospital, owned by the Catholic Church and founded in 1869, is the largest pediatric hospital and research center in Europe. The first lady personally wrote a letter to Pope Francis asking to visit the hospital, a spokesperson said.

Princess Diana and Mother Teresa are among those who have visited Bambino Gesù hospital.

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iStock/Thinkstock(CAIRO) -- The U.S. Embassy in Cairo issued a security warning about a potential threat posed by a group it referred to as a "terrorist organization."

"The embassy is aware of a potential threat posted on a website by the Hassm group, a known terrorist organization, suggesting some kind of unspecified action this evening," the embassy said in a security message. "The embassy has no further information about this potential threat but is in contact with Egyptian authorities."

Hassm is described as "a non-Salafi revolutionary jihadist group" that uses "violent insurgency tactics against Egyptian security forces, which they refer to as occupiers," according to the Terrorism Research & Analysis Consortium, a digital database of research and analysis focused on terrorism.

Hasam is a splinter group of the Muslim Brotherhood, a Sunni Islamist organization and political party, according to TRAC.

The message urges Americans living in Egypt to follow security guidelines provided by the State Department for dealing with possible threats.

"U.S. citizens should continue to follow sound security practices and adhere to the security guidelines provided in the travel warning for Egypt issued by the State Department on Dec. 23, 2016," according to the message.

Additional information will be provided if it becomes available, the message said.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Authorities tell ABC News that they found a kind of bomb-making workshop in Salman Abedi’s home and he had apparently stockpiled enough chemicals to make additional bombs.

The hunt is intensifying for what British authorities suspect is a possible “network” behind the deadly suicide blast outside an Ariana Grande concert at Manchester Arena on Monday, officials say.

The search stretched from the U.K. to Libya, where officials made multiple arrests in a country seen by American officials as a burgeoning new base of operations for ISIS, which has claimed Salman Abedi was a "soldier of the Caliphate."

Counterterrorism officials fear whoever built the bomb that killed 22 people and injured more than 50 others may have built other improvised-explosive devices which could be used in further attacks.

“I think it’s very clear that this is a network that we are investigating,” Ian Hopkins, chief constable of the Greater Manchester Police, said in a press briefing.

According to a terrorism expert who has been briefed on the investigation, the bomb featured a sophisticated design similar to the bombs used in the attacks in Brussels in 2016.

The expert confirmed that Abedi traveled to Manchester Arena by train, likely carrying the bomb in a backpack. The device, a metal container stuffed with bolts and nails, was apparently hooked to a powerful battery and featured a remote, cell-phone detonator with built-in redundancies to ensure a blast even if a first attempt failed.

The design was sophisticated enough to bolster the theory that Abedi didn’t act alone, suggesting, according to the expert, “there’s a bomb maker on the loose.”

"It's really suggesting that he probably did not act alone, that he probably had some help, that he certainly had some advice on how to create the bomb," said Matt Olsen, former director of the U.S. National Counterterrorism Center and an ABC News contributor.

 A western counterterrorism official told ABC News hours after the attack that British-born Abedi had only days earlier returned from an extended trip to his ancestral Libya, which has seen large towns under ISIS control in the past two years.

Libyan authorities Wednesday arrested both the bomber’s father, Ramadan, and the bomber's younger brother Hashim. Ramadan told Reuters that Salman was not a member of any terror group, but a spokesperson for Libyan special forces told ABC News that, following his arrest, Hashim admitted his involvement in the plot and told authorities that he and Salman consider themselves members of ISIS.

Hashim knew his brother was planning a suicide attack, the spokesperson said, but he didn’t know the time or place or target. According to the spokesperson, Hashim said he and Salman had been studying ISIS videos online since 2015, including videos offering instruction on how to make a bomb.

British officials expressed anger at American security officials over the leak to U.S. news media of Abedi's name hours after the attack, when they already realized he might have accomplices they needed to locate as fast as possible to prevent more lives being lost in a followup attack, one senior western official told ABC News.

Past plots to successfully attack Paris and Brussels were hatched by core-ISIS in its Syria stronghold Raqqa, but counterterrorism investigators believe Abedi dropped out of university in Manchester this year and visited Tripoli "to get some skills" from the terror group's operatives there. If true, it would be the first core-ISIS plot hatched from outside Syria and possibly signals a significant shift.

The U.S. military's Joint Special Operations Command has gradually increased its operations in Libya, killing the top ISIS leader last year in an airstrike and other senior leaders there.

The U.K. has raised its threat level and deployed troops including elite anti-terrorism commandos of the Special Air Service.

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Vatican Pool/Getty Images(ROME) — President Donald Trump and Pope Francis exchanged gifts Wednesday following their cordial, private meeting at the Vatican that lasted about 30 minutes.

In standard practice, the pope gave rosaries to the president's visiting U.S. delegation, including first lady Melania Trump and the president's son-in-law and daughter, White House advisers Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump.

The pope gave the president a large medal by a Roman artist, inscribed with an olive branch — a symbol of peace.

Pope Francis also gave Trump this year's "message of peace" with a personalized inscription he had written.

"We can use peace," Trump said. "That's so beautiful. Thank you."

Other gifts from the pope include his three writings on the topics of family, the joy of the gospel and "care of our common home, the environment," which the pope said he gives to all Catholics.

Included in these three writings is Pope Francis' 2015 encyclical "Laudato Si," in which he calls for global action to combat climate change.

"Well I'll be reading them," Trump said after receiving the gifts.

In return, President Trump gave Pope Francis a set of books by civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. presented in a custom, hand-made display case.

"I think you will enjoy them," Trump told the pope.

The first-edition collection includes Stride Toward Freedom, The Measure of a Man, Why We Can’t Wait, Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? and The Strength to Love, which has Dr. King's signature.

According to the White House, each book is "custom-bound and accented with gold hand-tooling."

In addition to the books, Trump gave the pope a piece of the Dr. King monument, the Stone of Hope, engraved with a quote, and a hand-made bronze sculpture of a floating lotus by a Florida artist titled "Rising Above." The sculpture represents "hope for a peaceful tomorrow" the White House said.

Before parting ways, President Trump thanked the pontiff and said, "I won't forget what you said."

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Riccardo De Luca/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(ROME) — President Donald Trump discussed terrorism with Pope Francis at the Vatican on Wednesday, in a highly anticipated first meeting between the two leaders that went longer than scheduled.

According to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, the pope and Trump had "pretty extensive conversations around extreme terrorist threats and extremism and radicalization of young people."

"That's one of the reasons the meeting apparently went long," Tillerson told reporters aboard Air Force One flying to Brussels, the next leg of Trump's foreign trip. "They got into quite a good conversation about it."

Tillerson said, "We did have a good exchange on the climate change issue" with Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Vatican's secretary of state, but added that he didn't know if Trump and Francis discussed the topic.

Parolin encouraged "continued participation" in the Paris Climate Agreement, according to Tillerson.

Tillerson said Trump still has not made up his mind whether he'll withdraw the U.S. from the 2015 deal.

"The president indicated we're still thinking about that, that he hasn't made a final decision. He, I think, told both Cardinal Parolin and also told Prime Minister [Paolo] Gentiloni that this is something that he would be taking up for a decision when we return from this trip," Tillerson said.

According to a statement from the Vatican, the pope and the president held "cordial discussions" that included "an exchange of views on various themes relating to international affairs and the promotion of peace in the world through political negotiation and interreligious dialogue, with particular reference to the situation in the Middle East and the protection of Christian communities."

"It is hoped that there may be serene collaboration between the state and the Catholic Church in the United States, engaged in service to the people in the fields of health care, education and assistance to immigrants," the statement reads.

Later in the day, during his meeting with the Italian prime minister, Trump said his meeting with Francis was "great."

"He is something," Trump said of the pontiff. "We had a fantastic meeting."

He added, "We're liking Italy very, very much, and it was an honor to be with the pope."

After their private one-on-one meeting, which lasted about 30 minutes, Trump and Francis exchanged gifts in front of reporters and the president's visiting delegation, which included his wife, Melania Trump; his daughter Ivanka Trump; his son-in-law, Jared Kushner; Tillerson and other White House advisers.

The president gave the pope a case of books by Martin Luther King Jr., and the pope gave Donald Trump a medal by a Roman artist, inscribed with an olive branch.

Francis explained that the branch is a symbol of peace, and Trump replied, "We can use peace."

The pope also presented Trump with three books that he said he sends to all Catholics: one on family, one on the Gospels and one on "care of our common home, the environment."

"Well, I'll be reading them," Trump said.

The visit to the Vatican was the third stop of Trump's tour of sites representing three major religions. Over the weekend, he stopped in Saudi Arabia, where he delivered an address to Muslim leaders, and Monday through Tuesday he visited Israel and the West Bank and met with Israeli and Palestinian leaders.

Trump and Francis certainly had differences to iron out during their meeting. In February 2016, the pontiff remarked on then-candidate Trump's key proposal to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, saying it was not Christian.

"A person who thinks only about building walls, wherever they may be, and not building bridges is not Christian," Pope Francis said.

Trump responded with a statement calling Francis' remarks "disgraceful."

"No leader, especially a religious leader, should have the right to question another man's religion or faith," Trump said. "They're using the pope as a pawn and they should be ashamed of themselves — that's the Mexican government — they should be ashamed of themselves for doing so, especially when so many lives are involved and when illegal immigration is so rampant and so dangerous and so bad for the United States."

Asked recently what he expected from his meeting with Trump, given their differing views, Francis replied, "I will tell him what I think. He will tell me what he thinks. But I never wanted to judge someone before I listen to the person first."


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iStock/Thinkstock(MANCHESTER, England) — The frantic search for clues about Salman Abedi, the suspected Manchester Arena bomber, and his possible connections to ISIS is underway.

Police say they conducted a pair of raids on Tuesday, one in the Whalley Range neighborhood, in which they scoured the suspect’s home, the other in nearby Fallowfield, which police said included a “controlled explosion to enable safe entry.” Authorities also took one man, identified by neighbors as the bomber’s older brother, into custody outside a local grocery store.

The portrait emerging of the alleged bomber, who is believed to have detonated an improvised explosive device that killed him and 22 people and injured dozens more outside an Ariana Grande concert on Monday night, is one of a potentially disaffected young man who grew up in an area identified as a hotbed for jihadi recruitment.

Abedi, 22, was described as the son of a family who emigrated from Libya and, according to Robin Simcox, a terrorism and national security analyst at The Heritage Foundation, one of the hundreds of young men known to British counterterrorism authorities as potential threat.

“Abedi was a terrorist suspect in the U.K., MI5 were aware of him,” Simcox told ABC News. “They were aware that he posed a potential threat but they didn’t think he posed an imminent threat that he proved himself to do in Manchester.”

A photo of Abedi was first published on the front page of the British newspaper The Sun.

In recent years, Abedi took business classes at the University of Salford in Manchester, where he registered for classes this year, a university spokesperson told ABC News, but hasn’t attended any classes and was not well-known socially.

A senior counterterrorism official told ABC that one reason Abedi may have dropped out of college is because he recently traveled outside the United Kingdom to Libya and possibly other countries, "it seems, to get some skills,” though Syria did not appear to be one of his destinations.

Abedi, the official said, was on the radar of British security officials but time ran out on the surveillance clock without Abedi doing anything nefarious, so authorities apparently moved on. It is unknown, the official added, whether Abedi made the device on his own or if he had help.

Mohammed Saeed, the imam of the local Didsbury Mosque and Islamic Centre, where Abedi sometimes worshipped, told ABC News that Abedi became angry with him after he gave a sermon in 2015 in which he criticized ISIS.

"He was showing me hate, he hated me basically," Saeed said. "I was shocked, shocked and angry. All innocent lives matter.”

The neighborhood, around an area called Moss Side, just a few miles from the concert hall, is considered by police to be a hot bed of ISIS recruitment, according to Dr. Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, the research director of the program on extremism at The George Washington University.

“Moss Side is very well known,” Hitchens told ABC News. “A lot of people with petty criminal pasts, involvement in gangs, getting involved instead with ISIS later on.”

According to Matt Olsen, the former director of the National Counterterrorism Center and an ABC News contributor, the most pressing questions have yet to be answered.

“The investigators need to focus and are focused on who else may be involved, where did this individual learn to build a device like this, to carry out an attack like this,” Olsen said. “The real question is, is there a cell that goes beyond this individual.”

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ABCNews.com(MANCHESTER, England) -- U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May said Tuesday the threat level in the region has been raised from severe to critical following Monday's attack in Manchester.

Critical is the highest of the five threat levels. Soldiers will now be deployed at public events and police officers responsible for guarding key sites will be replaced by armed military officers. Military officers may also be deployed at key events.

The change indicates that another attack may be imminent.

May said the U.K. could not ignore the possibility that more individuals are linked to the Manchester Arena attack.

The man suspected of carrying out the explosion at an Ariana Grande concert was identified as 22-year-old Salman Abedi, police said Tuesday. At least 22 people died and more than 50 were injured in the blast.

Abedi died at the scene after using an improvised explosive device, officials said. Police are still trying to determine if he acted alone or was part of a group.

The suspect was originally identified as a 23-year-old male according to a source; police have now said the suspect was 22.

A 23-year-old man has been arrested in South Manchester in connection with the attack, police said. Police also said authorities executed two warrants as part of the investigation: one in the Whalley Range district of Manchester and one in the Manchester suburb of Fallowfield, where a controlled explosion took place.

Greater Manchester Police are requesting dashcam footage from "anyone who was in Manchester city centre" between 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. Monday night as part of their investigation.

A 39-year-old man was also arrested in Birmingham Tuesday near a vigil for the attack. The man is "known to police and is thought to have a history of mental ill-health," Birmingham police said in a statement. A small ax and large stick were recovered at the vigil, police said.

ISIS has claimed responsibility for the explosion. In a statement translated from Arabic, ISIS said that a "soldier of the caliphate" placed explosives at a gathering of "crusaders" — meaning Christians — at the Manchester Arena. The statement said about 30 people were killed and about 70 more were wounded.

The explosion is being treated as a terrorist attack.

Greater Manchester Police said officers were called to the Manchester Arena just before 10:35 p.m. local time on Monday. The explosion happened near the arena's foyer after the concert, according to witnesses, who reported hearing a bang as they exited.

An 8-year-old girl named Saffie Rose Roussos is among those killed.

Twelve children under the age of 16 were seriously injured, officials said.

"We struggle to comprehend the warped and twisted mind that sees a room packed with young children not as a scene to cherish but as an opportunity for carnage," May said Tuesday.

Witness Joseph Harries told ABC News' "Good Morning America" that "people were just trying to get out of the arena as fast as they possibly could after the blast. I was directly in front of the stage at the heart of the arena. I had exactly the same distance to get out of any of the doors."

"I had my best friend with me and I grabbed hold of her wrist and told her never let go of me," Harries said. "We just ran, we jumped over chairs, railings to get out of the doors, we had to force open doors that wouldn’t open because people were trying to get to – the entire capacity of the 20,000 person arena were trying to get out of one exit."

"It felt like an eternity," Harries said, but it "couldn’t have been more than two, three minutes from in our seats to outside of the arena."

The Greater Manchester Police tweeted Tuesday that officials do not believe there are any unaccompanied children at Manchester-area hotels.

A U.S. State Department official told ABC News Tuesday that the "U.S. Embassy in London is working to determine if any U.S. citizens were affected," adding, "at this time, we are not aware of any U.S. citizens killed or injured."

"The whole nation has been shocked," Queen Elizabeth II said in a statement. "I know I speak for everyone in expressing my deepest sympathy to all who have been affected by this dreadful event and especially to the families and friends of those who have died or were injured."

"I want to thank all the members of the emergency services, who have responded with such professionalism and care," the queen continued. "And I would like to express my admiration for the way the people of Manchester have responded, with humanity and compassion, to this act of barbarity."

A spokesperson for the Manchester Arena tweeted Tuesday, "Last night, our community suffered a senseless tragedy. Our entire team’s thoughts and focus are now on supporting the people affected and their families.

"We are assisting the police in any way we can. We cannot praise the emergency services enough for their response and have been inspired by the way the people of this great city of Manchester rallied round last night and have continued to respond Tuesday. It shows the very best of this city."

 

pic.twitter.com/a5QUJtwgwp

— Manchester Arena (@ManchesterArena) May 23, 2017

 

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Franco Origlia/Getty Images(VATICAN CITY) -- After a history of public disagreements on issues from the border wall to climate change to what it means to be Christian, President Donald Trump and Pope Francis will meet for the first time in person Wednesday morning, at the Vatican.

The public back-and-forth began during the presidential campaign when Pope Francis alluded to Trump in an interview, saying a man who builds walls instead of bridges isn't a man of faith.

"A person who thinks only about building walls, wherever they may be, and not of building bridges, is not Christian," the pontiff said on Feb. 18 aboard the papal plane.

"This is not the gospel. As far as what you said about whether I would advise to vote or not to vote," Pope Francis said. "I am not going to get involved in that. I say only that this man is not Christian if he has said things like that. We must see if he said things in that way and I will give him the benefit of the doubt."

Trump, who was leading the Republican primary race at the time, responded by saying the pope might regret his statements.

"If and when the Vatican is attacked by ISIS, which as everyone knows is ISIS' ultimate trophy, I can promise you that the pope would have only wished and prayed that Donald Trump would have been president," Trump said during an appearance in South Carolina that same day.

Trump went on to argue that the Mexican government was "using the Pope as a pawn" and wrongfully feeding him information.

"That's the Mexican government," he said. "They should be ashamed of themselves for doing so, especially when so many lives are involved and when illegal immigration is so rampant and so dangerous and so bad for the United States.”

Trump then said he "likes" the pope, but considered his comments "disgraceful."

"For a religious leader to question a person’s faith is disgraceful," Trump said in a statement released the same day. “I am proud to be a Christian and as President I will not allow Christianity to be consistently attacked and weakened, unlike what is happening now, with our current President. No leader, especially a religious leader, should have the right to question another man’s religion or faith.”

The two men started softening their public stances in the lead up to this visit. After it was announced that Trump would be paying the Catholic leader a visit, Pope Francis acknowledged that they may not see eye to eye.

When asked about what he expects from his meeting with Trump, given that they have very different views on immigration and climate change, the pontiff replied that he doesn't want to prejudge the president before he has met with him.

"I will tell him what I think, he will tell me what he thinks, but I never wanted to judge someone before I listen to the person first," the pope said aboard the papal plane on May 13.

The two leaders differ greatly in their views on immigration and climate change. Trump has said he wants to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement and has declared climate change to be a "hoax." Pope Francis has written an encyclical, or papal letter, on the environment, in which he calls for global action to combat climate change.

The pope said he won't try to persuade Trump to embrace his views. "I am not a proselytiser," he said.

When asked if he hopes Trump will soften his stance after their meeting, the pope said it's a "political calculus" he cannot afford.

Instead, the Catholic leader said he would be honest and open with Trump and expects to talk about "common things."

"There are always doors that are not completely shut," Pope Francis said. "We need to find the doors that are at least slightly open."

He added that people should say what they think, but "with respect."

For his part, Trump has kept an optimistic tone about the visit.

At an April 20 news conference, Trump said "I look very much forward to meeting the pope."

During his commencement speech at the Coast Guard Academy, Trump said that he will "talk with Pope Francis about the contributions of Christian teachings to the world."

Finally, in a weekly video address previewing his foreign trip, Trump described the meeting as a "great honor."

"I look forward to speaking with the pope about how Christian teachings can help put the world on a path to justice, freedom and peace," he said.

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Dave Thompson/Getty Images(MANCHESTER, England) -- ISIS has claimed responsibility for an explosion Monday at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, that killed 22 people and injured 59 others.

In a statement translated from Arabic, ISIS said that a "soldier of the caliphate" placed explosives at a gathering of "crusaders" -- meaning Christians -- at the Manchester Arena. The statement said about 30 people were killed and about 70 more were wounded.

The man believed to be the lone attacker died at the scene after using an improvised explosive device, officials said, but police are still trying to determine if he acted alone or was part of a group, said U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May.

Authorities in the United Kingdom have preliminarily identified the bomber as 23-year-old Salman Abedi, sources familiar with the probe said.

The explosion is being treated as a terrorist attack, and May said the threat level remains at severe, meaning the government considers another attack highly likely. The severe level is the second highest of five, with critical the highest.

Greater Manchester Police said a 23-year-old man was arrested in South Manchester in connection with the attack.

Police also said authorities executed two warrants as a part of the investigation: one in the Whalley Range district of Manchester and one in the Manchester suburb of Fallowfield, where a controlled explosion took place.

Greater Manchester Police said officers were called to the Manchester Arena just before 10:35 p.m. local time on Monday. The explosion happened near the arena's foyer after the concert, according to witnesses, who reported hearing a bang as they exited.

The venue holds about 21,000 people and is one of Europe's largest indoor arenas, according to its website. The arena is connected to the Manchester Victoria Station, the city's second-largest train station.

An 8-year-old girl named Saffie Rose Roussos is among those killed.

Twelve children under the age of 16 were seriously injured, officials said.

"We struggle to comprehend the warped and twisted mind that sees a room packed with young children not as a scene to cherish but as an opportunity for carnage," May said Tuesday.

Greater Manchester Police are requesting dashcam footage from "anyone who was in Manchester city centre" between 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. Monday night as part of their investigation.

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iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) -- The deadly suicide bombing in Manchester, England, that killed 22 people and injured 59 others at an Ariana Grande concert Monday night is one of several terror attacks that have taken place in the U.K. in recent years.

The British people have endured politically-motivated attacks, attacks by right-wing extremists and attacks by Islamic extremists over the last few decades.

April 1999: David Copeland bombings

David Copeland was convicted in 2000 of killing three people and injuring 139 others after perpetrating a series of nail-bombing attacks that took place across the month of April 1999, according to reports by BBC News.

He was given six life sentences for his crimes.

Copeland, who belonged to far right-wing fascist groups according to a report in The Independent, targeted black, South Asian and gay Londoners in his plot.

July 7, 2005: London Underground attack

Four suicide bombers armed with "rucksacks full of explosives" attacked civilians traveling on London Underground trains as well as a double-decker bus on the morning of July 7, 2005. More than 50 people were killed and hundreds of others were injured, according to a report by BBC News.

Mohammad Sidique Khan, 30, Shehzad Tanweer, 22, Hasib Hussain, 18, and Germaine Lindsay, 19, carried out the attacks, according to the BBC.

The attackers were motivated by Islamic extremism, and Khan recorded a video prior to carrying out the attacks in which he praised al-Qaeda founder Osama bin Laden.

May 22, 2013: Murder of Lee Rigby

Two Islamic extremists savagely murdered Lee Rigby, a British soldier and veteran of the Afghanistan War, just outside an army barrack, telling eyewitnesses the killing was "as an eye for an eye ... because Muslims are dying by British soldiers every day," according to ABC News reporting from that time.

The killers, Michael Adebolajo and Michael Adebowale, first ran over Rigby in a car then dragged him into the middle of the street in the South London neighborhood of Woolwich.

There, they hacked him to death with large knives, according to eyewitnesses.

Adebolajo and Adebowale were sentenced to life in prison in December of 2013, according to a report by BBC News.

Dec. 5, 2015: Leytonstone knife attack


Shortly after the Paris attacks in November of 2015, a 29-year-old man, Muhaydin Mire, was restrained and arrested for attempted murder after trying to stab people in the Leytonstone metro station with a knife.

The attack left a 56-year-old man in the hospital with serious but not life-threatening knife injuries, and a second man suffered minor injuries but did not require medical assistance, police said, according to an ABC News report at the time.

Mire, a former Uber driver with a history of mental health issues, had an interest in the terror group ISIS, according to a report in The Standard.

He pleaded guilty to attempted murder in 2016.

June 16, 2016: Assassination of Jo Cox


Jo Cox, a British member of Parliament, was killed in broad daylight after a town hall meeting at a library in West Yorkshire, England, one week prior to the Brexit referendum, according to ABC News' reporting from last summer.

Her killer, Thomas Mair, was a longtime supporter of a U.S.-based neo-Nazi organization, according to a watchdog group that tracks extremists. The Guardian reported that he had an interest in Nazism.

Mair is serving a life sentence for the crime.

March 22, 2017: Westminster Bridge attack


Three people were killed, including a police officer, and at least 29 people were hospitalized following an attack in London that took place earlier this year.

The attack began when a driver struck pedestrians and three police officers on Westminster Bridge, London's Metropolitan Police said.

Richard Tice, a witness, told ABC News that he saw injured people lined up along the pavement. According to Tice, the car jumped the curb, knocking over pedestrians.

The car then crashed into the fence around the Houses of Parliament, and a man armed with a knife attacked an officer who was guarding Parliament, according to police.

The suspect, 52-year-old Briton Khalid Masood, was shot and killed by police.

ISIS called Masood "a soldier of the Islamic State."

May 23, 2017: Manchester suicide bombing

ISIS claimed responsibility for the deadly explosion at the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, Monday evening. Twenty-two people died and 59 others were injured in the attack.

The attacker died at the scene after using an improvised explosive device, officials said, and it's unclear at this time to what degree, if any, he received assistance from outside actors.

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MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images(ROME) -- President Trump has arrived in Rome, Italy, ahead of his first audience with Pope Francis at the Vatican Wednesday.

The visit to the Vatican marks the third stop of Trump's tour visiting sites representing three major world religions. Over the weekend, the president stopped in Saudi Arabia where he delivered an address to Muslim leaders, and Monday through Tuesday he visited Israel and the West Bank where he met with Israeli and Palestinian leaders.

The president and Pope Francis will certainly have differences to iron out during their meeting. In February 2016 when Trump was a candidate, the pontiff remarked on the Republican's key campaign proposal to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, saying it was un-Christian.

"A person who thinks only about building walls, wherever they may be, and not building bridges, is not Christian," the pope said.

Trump responded at the time with a statement calling Francis' remarks "disgraceful," and suggesting that Mexico was using the religious leader as a "pawn."

"No leader, especially a religious leader, should have the right to question another man’s religion or faith," Trump said. "They are using the pope as a pawn and they should be ashamed of themselves for doing so, especially when so many lives are involved and when illegal immigration is so rampant."

The president and the pope have also staked out different approaches to climate change, and their upcoming meeting comes as Trump weighs whether to pull the United States out of the Paris Climate Agreement, which he had previously promised to cancel within his first 100 days in office.

When the pope was asked recently what he expects from his meeting with Trump, given their differing views, he replied that he doesn't want to prejudge the president before he has met him.

"I will tell him what I think, he will tell me what he thinks, but I never wanted to judge someone before I listen to the person first," the pope said.

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Leon Neal/Getty Images(MANCHESTER, England) -- A teenage girl who was at the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, Monday night, said she felt a shake, saw people crying, and then "went out the doors and we saw smoke everywhere."

"I looked to my right and there was just a decomposed body," the teen, Natalie Sully, said on ABC News' Good Morning America. "All you could see was just flesh."

"Then there was another bang, but we weren’t sure what it was, 'cause it wasn’t as loud as the other one," she said. "But then everyone was freaking out again, running."

"To be experiencing that at such a young age, seeing dead bodies, it was horrible," she said.

Lydia, a mother who was at the concert with her daughter, Madison, said she saw her life flash before her eyes.

Lydia told ABC News' Molly Hunter that she and her daughter, Madison, were heading towards the main entrance after the concert when she heard a bang -- but she said she didn’t think too much of it. Lydia said she figured the noise was a speaker and that she never would have thought it was an explosion.

It wasn't until she saw a sea of people running and shouting about an explosion that she knew it was serious, Lydia said.

Madison added, "I remember going out and then hearing a loud bang and then everyone running."

Lydia said she and her daughter started running but she worried they would be stampeded on their way down the stairs.

Lydia said she was grasping her daughter's hand tightly, describing the scene as complete panic and chaos. She said lots of mothers and children were screaming.

"We didn’t know whether it was a gunman," Lydia said, explaining that she was worried if a gunman would be waiting for them as they fled down the stairs.

Witness Joseph Harries told ABC News' Good Morning America, that "people were just trying to get out of the arena as fast as they possibly could after the blast. I was directly in front of the stage at the heart of the arena. I had exactly the same distance to get out of any of the doors."

"I had my best friend with me and I grabbed hold of her wrist and told her never let go of me," Harries said. "We just ran, we jumped over chairs, railings to get out of the doors, we had to force open doors that wouldn’t open because people were trying to get to – the entire capacity of the 20,000 person arena were trying to get out of one exit."

"It felt like an eternity," Harries said, but it "couldn’t have been more than two, three minutes from in our seats to outside of the arena."

Harries said he did not see any injuries or fatalities but his friend told him "he’d seen a girl covered in blood and she had bandages. ... He said it was traumatic and a horrendous experience."

The deadly explosion at the concert at the Manchester Arena killed 22 people and injured 59 others. Greater Manchester Police said they were called to the arena just before 10:35 p.m. local time on Monday.

The explosion happened near the arena’s foyer after the concert finished, according to witnesses. The venue holds about 21,000 people and is one of Europe’s largest indoor arenas, according to its website.

The man believed to be the lone attacker died at the scene after using an improved explosive device, officials said, but police are still determining if the attacker acted alone or as part of a wider group, said British Prime Minister Theresa May.

Monday's incident is being treated as a terror attack and May said the threat level remains at "severe," meaning the government considers another terror attack highly likely. Severe is level 4 out of 5, with critical being the highest.

May said police believe they know the identity of the suspect but at this stage they cannot confirm his name.

"We struggle to comprehend the warped and twisted mind that sees a room packed with young children not as a scene to cherish but as an opportunity for carnage," May said Tuesday.

May said these "innocent, defenseless children and young people" "should have been enjoying one of the most memorable nights of their lives."

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OLI SCARFF/AFP/Getty Images(MANCHESTER, England) -- Children are among the 22 killed and 59 injured in a "sickening" attack at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, Monday night, United Kingdom Prime Minister Theresa May said Tuesday.

An 8-year-old girl named Saffie Rose Roussos is among those killed.

Twelve children under the age of 16 were seriously injured, officials said.

Monday's incident is being treated as a terror attack and May said the threat level remains at "severe," meaning the government considers another terror attack highly likely. Severe is level 4 out of 5, with critical being the highest.

May said the attacker -- who died at the scene after using an improved explosive device -- deliberately targeted children and young people "who should have been enjoying one of the most memorable nights of their lives."

"We struggle to comprehend the warped and twisted mind that sees a room packed with young children not as a scene to cherished but as an opportunity for carnage," May said.

A suicide bomber was likely behind the attack, officials said, and May said police believe one man carried it out, but authorities still need to know if he was acting alone. May said police believe they know the identity of the suspect but at this stage they cannot confirm his name.

May, who will travel to Manchester Tuesday, said, "there will be difficult days ahead." She said many people are experiencing unimaginable worry as they still try to find out what happened to their loved ones.

Ian Hopkins, Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police, said at a press conference Tuesday, "Our priority is to work with the national counter-terrorism policing network to establish more details about the individual who carried out this attack."

It was unclear if the attacker was acting as a part of a terrorist organization, according to Hopkins, who said the investigation was “complex and wide-ranging.”

"The priority is to establish whether he was acting alone or as part of a network," Hopkins said. "We would ask people not to speculate on his details or share names."

President Donald Trump offered his condolences in remarks during a visit to Israel, saying the victims were "murdered by evil losers."

"I won't call them monsters because they'd like that term. They'd think that's a great name," Trump said in Bethlehem after a visit with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. "I will call them from now on losers because that's what they are. They're losers and we'll have more of them. But they're losers remember that."

Greater Manchester Police said they were called to the Manchester Arena just before 10:35 p.m. local time on Monday. The explosion happened inside of the arena’s foyer area after the concert finished, according to witnesses, who reported hearing a loud bang as they exited the arena.

The venue holds about 21,000 people and is one of Europe’s largest indoor arenas, according to its website. The concert arena is connected to the Manchester Victoria Station, the city’s second-largest train station.

Abby Barker, who attended the concert, told ABC News that Grande had just left the stage when there was a loud bang.

"I looked across the arena and everyone over there started running in different directions, screaming in panic," she said. "We all started panicking too and ran out the doors and ran down the stairs out of the arena. We got outside and children were crying their eyes out, people talking about it being a bomb/gunshots, there were many parents running towards the arena but no one knew exactly what it was."

Hundreds of police officers were on the scene overnight and transportation security was beefed up in Manchester and in other areas, according to police.

The mayors of several major cities across the globe, including those of London and New York City, also said they were reviewing their security measures as a precaution after the attack.

The British Transport Police department said extra officers would be on patrol at "key railway stations as well as on trains around the country” in the wake of the attack.

"Throughout the day, commuters can expect to see additional officers on their journey,” BTP Assistant Chief Constable Robin Smith said in a statement early Tuesday. "This will include both armed and unarmed officers.”

"The whole nation has been shocked," Queen Elizabeth II said in a statement. "I know I speak for everyone in expressing my deepest sympathy to all who have been affected by this dreadful event and especially to the families and friends of those who have died or were injured."

"I want to thank all the members of the emergency services, who have responded with such professionalism and care," the Queen continued. "And I would like to express my admiration for the way the people of Manchester have responded, with humanity and compassion, to this act of barbarity."

An emergency hotline was set up for people concerned for “loved ones who may not have returned home, police said, and social networking giant Facebook activated its global “safety check“ feature in the wake of the deadly attack.

May said General Election campaigning would be suspended.

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