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Korea Summit Press Pool/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- North Korea has vowed this week to dismantle their nuclear testing facility at Punggye-ri in front of the world’s media, the latest sign of goodwill in the rapidly developing detente on the Korean Peninsula.

North Korean news agency KCNA previously announced that foreign media would be invited to cover the event to show the process in a "transparent manner."

Though in the last week there have been some heated threats from North Korean officials to pull out of the upcoming June 12 summit with President Donald Trump, it appears that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is still going ahead with closing down his nuclear testing facility.

Kim announced in April that he no longer needed to conduct nuclear tests because the country had achieved its "nuclear weaponization."

Location

The nuclear testing site near the village of Punggye-ri in the northeast of the country has been the site of all six North Korean underground nuclear tests from 2006 until the most recent one on Sept. 3, 2017.

The facility is built into the granite base of Mount Mantap, roughly 100 miles from North Korea’s border with China and Mount Paektu, an active volcano and the country’s sacred mountain.

Condition of the site

The hydrogen bomb that North Korea tested in September 2017 was estimated to be at least 10 times more powerful than the one the U.S. dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, at the end of World War II in 1945. Upon detonation it yielded a 6.3-magnitude earthquake followed by a smaller 4.6-magnitude earthquake followed several minutes later. Both the U.S. Geological Survey and the China Earthquake Networks Center described the second event as a possible "collapse" of the site. Two aftershocks were detected in the area as late as December 2017 in a region without a history of natural seismic activity.

Until this week, the true condition of the site was unclear because of the restricted access to Punngye-ri. Any analysis had to be done via satellite photographs.

In April, a Chinese academic study by researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China suggested that "near vertical on-site collapse toward the nuclear test center" occurred after the initial blast and that the event may have rendered the site unstable for further tests. The study called for monitoring for potential radiation leakage.

According to South Korean President Moon Jae-in's spokesperson Yoon Young-chan, however, Kim told Moon at their April 27 inter-Korean Summit that the site had new tunnels that were "in very good condition."

Analysts at the U.S.-based North Korea-monitoring website 38 North appeared to back up Kim’s claim in a April 30 report saying they see evidence that "the two mountainous areas accessible by the South and West Portals remain viable, and could support future underground nuclear testing if there were to be a political decision to do so."

What we may see this week

On May 12, North Korean state media said the dismantlement process will involve "collapsing all of its tunnels with explosions, blocking its entrances, and removing all observation facilities, research buildings and security posts."

Two 38 North reported last week that in the beginning of May the North Koreans began taking down buildings and infrastructure around the testing facility and appear to have built an observation platform for the visiting media this week.

Can the process be reversed?

If the political winds change once more, the collapsed tunnels could easily be re-excavated.

Ankit Panda of Asia-Pacific affairs magazine The Diplomat reported that a U.S. intelligence assessment determined it would take mere "weeks to months" for Pyongyang to reverse course.




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iStock/Thinkstock(SANTA FE, Texas) -- She arrived from halfway around the globe but 17-year-old Sabika Sheikh was determined to bring her native Pakistan closer to America, the Texas family who took in the foreign exchange student told mourners at her funeral on Sunday.

Politicians, religious leaders, and friends packed the Masjid al-Sabireen mosque in the Houston suburb of Stafford to celebrate the girl who was one of eight students and two teachers killed, allegedly by a 17-year-old classmate on Friday at their high school in Santa Fe, Texas.

"She was the most beautiful, loving person I've ever met," said Jaelyn Cogburn, whose family took in Sabika six months ago as part of the Youth Exchange and Study program sponsored by the U.S. State Department.

Jaelyn told the mourners that she had been homeschooled up until this year and when she enrolled at Santa Fe High School, Sabika, who had yet to move into the Cogburn home, was the first friend she made.

"It was hard when I started school because I didn’t know anybody, but then I met Sabika and she didn't know anyone, either," said Jaelyn. "And we both became very close."

She said Sabika was scheduled to return home in about three weeks and she was already feeling sad about her leaving.

"The other night we were going to our friend's house in a car and I was thinking about how she was about to go back to Pakistan and I was crying. No one saw me because I was in the dark. I was crying because I didn't want her to leave and she leaned over and she just said, 'I love you and I miss you,'" Jaelyn said.

"She was so loyal to her faith, her country and she only had good things to say about everybody. She loved her family. She couldn't wait to see them, and she loved us," Jaelyn added.

Jaelyn's mother, Joleen Cogburn, recalled a conversation she had with Sabika when she first came to live in her home about what she wanted to accomplish as a foreign exchange student.

"I asked her how she got involved with wanting to become a foreign exchange student and why, and she said, 'Because I want to learn the American culture and I want America to lean the Pakistan culture and I want us to come together and unite,'" Cogburn said.

She said she told Sabika how brave she was for being so young and leaving her family to come to America.

"I always told her, 'Sabika, you have a warrior's heart,'" she said. "She wanted to be a businesswoman and she said she wanted to impact the world, and I think she's done that."

Her husband, Jason Cogburn, said that in the short time Sabika lived with them, she became as close as one of his daughters.

"We had no idea what God was going to send us, but he sent us one of the most precious gifts I've ever had in life," Jason Cogburn said.

Despite coming from different cultures and religions, Sabika fit perfectly into his family, he said.

"We loved her and she loved us and we did things together," he said. "She wanted to be part of what we did and we wanted to be part of what she did."

He said Sabika even started working in his family's seafood business.

"When we went to work, she went to work," Jason Cogburn said. "When she started Ramadan and started fasting, my family did that with her because we did things together."

Sabika's funeral was the first of more to come.

Also killed in the attack were students Shana Fisher, 16; Angelique Ramirez, 15; Christopher Jake Stone, 17; Jared Black, 17; Christian Riley Garcia, 15; Aaron Kyle McLeod; and Kimberly Vaughan. Two teachers, Glenda Perkins and Cynthia Tisdale, 64, were also killed.

All their names were read at Sabika's funeral.

"We are still in a state of denial. We can’t believe it. It's like a nightmare," Sabika's father, Abdul Aziz Sheikh, told The Associated Press at his home in Karachi, Pakistan.

He said he hopes his daughter's death doesn't stop other students from following in her footsteps.

"One should not lose his heart by such kind of incidents," he added. "One should not stop going for education to the U.S. or U.K., or China, or anywhere. One must go for education undeterred. But controlling such incidents is the responsibility of the respective governments."

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Karwai Tang/WireImage(WINDSOR, England) -- The two designers of Meghan Markle's wedding dresses are finally speaking out after the bride walked down the aisle to wed Prince Harry Saturday inside St. George's Chapel in front of hundreds of relatives and guests.

Markle, now known as the Duchess of Sussex, first wore a wedding gown, made out of triple silk organza, featuring an open bateau neckline with three-quarter-length sleeves.

Her look, which was seen by millions watching around the world, was completed by her "something borrowed" -- Queen Mary's diamond bandeau tiara, which Queen Elizabeth loaned to Markle, complete with a flower-outlined veil that measured at 16 feet long.

Clare Waight Keller, the first female artistic director to head the house of Givenchy, said in comments to the press just what the groom thought of his bride's look.

"He came straight up to me and he said, 'Oh my god, thank you! She looks absolutely stunning,'" Waight Keller, 47, recalled. "Well, I think everybody saw on television -- he was absolutely in awe, I think. She looked just incredible, and it showed."

"So I think, for the both of them, they were just radiant at that time," she added.

The British designer called the royal wedding a "dream day" in a post on Instagram.

Keller, who accompanied Markle on her wedding day, also shared just what her role entailed.

"The moment they stepped out as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex," she said, "I was standing just inside making the final adjustments to the beautiful 5-meter veil before they descended the steps to their carriage."

For the wedding receptions, Markle stepped out in another wedding gown -- this time designed by British designer Stella McCartney.

The Duchess wore a silk crepe, floor-length gown with a high collar, according to Women's Wear Daily, which released sketches of the dress on Sunday. Markle completed her look by wearing "something blue" -- Aquazzura satin shoes with baby blue soles.

“I am so proud and honored to have been chosen by the Duchess of Sussex to make her evening gown and represent British design," McCartney, 46, told the magazine. “It has truly been one of the most humbling moments of my career, and I am so proud of all the team on this stunning, sunny royal day.”

The designers' comments about their memorable designs came as Kensington Palace released never-before-seen sketches of Markle's first wedding look.

"The Duchess and Ms. Waight Keller worked closely together on the design, epitomising a timeless minimal elegance referencing the codes of the iconic House of Givenchy," the palace added in a tweet.

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Nick Edwards/WPA Pool/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- The royal wedding had no shortage of special moments as Prince Harry and Meghan Markle tied the Windsor knot inside St. George's Chapel today, and it even included a few unexpected moments that you may have missed!

The dress

Markle was a vision in white as she walked down the aisle Saturday to greet Prince Harry.

Her wedding gown, made out of triple silk organza, featured an open bateau neckline with three-quarter-length sleeves.

It was designed by British designer Clare Waight Keller, 47, who became the first female artistic director to head the house of Givenchy.

"After meeting Ms. Waight Keller in early 2018, Ms. Markle chose to work with her for her timeless and elegant aesthetic, impeccable tailoring, and relaxed demeanour," a press release from Kensington Palace read. "Ms. Markle also wanted to highlight the success of a leading British talent who has now served as the creative head of three globally influential fashion houses -- Pringle of Scotland, Chloé, and now Givenchy."

A solo walk down the aisle

Markle's mother, Doria Ragland, had escorted the bride to St. George's Chapel before Markle confidently walked the first half of the aisle on her own, followed by her bridesmaids and page boys.

Prince Charles, the next King of England, then walked his new daughter-in-law down the second half of the aisle.

Markle, 36, asked Prince Charles to walk her down the aisle because her father, Thomas Markle Sr., who lives in Mexico, did not attend the wedding due to health concerns.

Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry's passionate address

One of the most memorable moments of the ceremony was the address delivered by the Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry, who traveled to Windsor from Chicago.

Curry, the head of the Episcopal Church, spoke passionately about the power of love and at one point quoted Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

"We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will make of this old world a new world," he said. "Love is the only way. There's power in love. Don't underestimate it. Don't even over-sentimentalize it. There's power, power in love."

The kiss

As the couple -- who now hold the titles of Duke and Duchess of Sussex -- walked out of the floral arches of St. George's Chapel, they shared their first kiss as newlyweds.

Princess Charlotte's scene-stealing moment


After the wedding, 3-year-old Princess Charlotte gave her uncle and new aunt a wave as the carriage swept them away.

The carriage procession

The wedding was followed by a carriage procession to give those gathered in Windsor an up-close look at the newlyweds.

The beaming couple waved nonstop as they passed by the cheering crowds of adults and children who gathered from across the world.

The American bride seemed touched by the outpouring of support, and at one point she placed her hand over her heart.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Handout/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- A young cellist named Sheku Kanneh-Mason impressed guests today, as he performed at the royal wedding ceremony just after Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were married.

The 19-year-old, who played with the orchestra during the signing of the register, is also the winner of 2016's BBC Young Musician award, Kensington Palace reports.

"Last June, Prince Harry saw Sheku play at an event in London in support of the work of Antiguan charity the Halo Foundation," the Palace tweeted.

Kanneh-Mason resides in the United Kingdom and this year, his debut album, "Inspiration," hit number 1 on the U.K. classical chart, according to his Twitter bio.

Last Month, the musician gushed about how excited he was to perform at Harry and Markle's wedding.

"I was bowled over when Ms Markle called me to ask if I would play during the ceremony, and of course I immediately said yes!!!" Kanneh-Mason wrote. "What a privilege. I can’t wait!"

Kannah-Mason grew up one of seven children and is currently a full-time scholarship student at The Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music, according to his website. He began learning the cello when he was 6 years old.

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Owen Humphreys/WPA Pool/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- It's safe to say that the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle was the most racially diverse ceremony of the British royal family in recent history.

The couple, now the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, exchanged vows Saturday inside St. George's Chapel in England in front of about 600 guests, with another 2,000 outside on the grounds of Windsor Castle and millions more watching on TV around the world.

The Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry, the first black presiding bishop of the American Episcopal Church, spoke, quoting African-American civil rights icon Martin Luther King, Jr.

"We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will make of this old world a new world," the bishop said. "Love is the only way. There's power in love. Don't underestimate it. Don't even over-sentimentalize it. There's power, power in love."

King's daughter, Bernice King, immediately recognized her late father's words.

She tweeted, "#MLK quote at the #RoyalWedding. Your life, teachings and words still matter so much, Daddy. Congrats, Harry and Meghan!"

Bernice King, 55, also used the opportunity to address a deeper issue, the reservations that some members of the African diaspora -- from both sides of the pond -- may have about the royal family due to Britain's history of colonization and its role in the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

"Dear Family: It’s okay to watch and be moved by the #RoyalWedding," she wrote Saturday. "It doesn’t make you insensitive or less caring about the inhumanity in the world. It doesn’t mean you’ve forgotten history. Find moments of joy. We need them to continue the work."

In his address, Bishop Curry referred to America's history of slavery.

"There was some old slaves in America's antebellum South who explained the dynamic power of love and why it has the power to transform. They explained it this way, they sang a spiritual, even in the midst of their captivity," Curry said. "This way of love, it is the way of life. They got it."

And immediately following Curry's address, a gospel choir performed, displaying the spirit of the black church.

Karen Gibson and the Kingdom Choir stood at the west end of Windsor Castle wearing different shades of pale pink to perform a soulful rendition of Ben E. King's 1962 hit, "Stand By Me."

It was not the first time The Kingdom Choir, who come from southeast England, has performed for British royalty. They were also tapped to perform at the Golden Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, celebrating her 50 years on the throne, in 2002.

The choir's musical interlude at Harry and Meghan's wedding was followed by a performance by the first black winner of the BBC Young Musician competition, 19-year-old cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason.

Later, the spotlight shone on the honorary chaplain to the queen, Rose Hudson-Wilkin, a black person born in Jamaica, as she addressed the gathering.

The lineup seemed to break with royal tradition and to embrace Markle's American and African-American heritage.

The fact that the former actress, who was born to a white father and black mother, proudly identifies as biracial has been the subject of headlines since the two became engaged last year.

In a poignant essay written for Elle magazine, Markle wrote that after struggling with her identity growing up in the San Fernando Valley neighborhood of Los Angeles, she matured into a "strong, confident mixed-race woman."

Still, her ascent to the royal family has not protected her from racism.

Kensington Palace condemned the discriminatory "racial undertones" in some early coverage of Markle when she began dating the Duke of Sussex in an unprecedented statement issued back in 2016.

"His girlfriend, Meghan Markle, has been subject to a wave of abuse and harassment," the statement read. "Some of this has been very public -- the smear on the front page of a national newspaper; the racial undertones of comment pieces; and the outright sexism and racism of social media trolls and web article comments."

The statement noted that Prince Harry was "deeply disappointed."

But if their wedding is any indication, the new duke and duchess may be the most inclusive members of the royal family yet.

For now, fans -- and some critics -- on social media seem intrigued.

One fan wrote that she was "grateful" for a ceremony "that connects us all not just as a diverse and multicultural nation, but to nearly every other nation around the world."

Yet another person warned that diversity at the royal wedding is just one very small step.

"Let's hope to see this beautiful diversity passing from the Royal family to every single aspect and corner in the UK," he wrote.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Nick Edwards/WPA Pool/Gety Images(WINDSOR, England) -- Prince Harry and Meghan Markle tied the knot in a spectacular wedding Saturday at St. George's Chapel.

The couple recited the Church of England's modernized vows, which omitted the word "obey," during their wedding ceremony.

"I, Harry, take you, Meghan, to be my wife, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part, according to Gods' holy law, in the presence of God, I make this vow," Harry said.

Meghan said: "I, Meghan, take you, Harry, to be my husband to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part, according to God's holy law in the presence of God, I make this vow."

Harry’s mother, the late Princess Diana, omitted "obey" when she said her vows to Harry’s father, Prince Charles, in 1981.

Markle’s new sister-in-law, Duchess Kate, also followed in Diana’s footsteps by omitting "obey" from her vows to Prince William during their 2011 wedding ceremony.

Markle became a member of the Church of England after being baptized and confirmed in March by the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby.

Markle wore a white wedding dress designed by Clare Waight Keller, the first female artistic director at French fashion house Givenchy, according to Kensington Palace.

Markle's new father-in-law, Prince Charles, walked Markle from the quire, the area of St. George’s Chapel where the clergy and choir sit, to Harry. The procession in the nave, the central part of the church, included the Dean of Windsor and Markle’s bridesmaids and page boys.

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Owen Humphreys/WPA Pool/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- The Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry flew across the pond from Chicago to Windsor, England, to deliver an impassioned sermon at Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding on Saturday.

Curry, the head of the Episcopal Church, spoke in his royal wedding address about the power of love and, at one point, quoted American civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Curry's sermon visibly moved guests inside St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle and also drew notice from some watching around the world, including King's youngest child.

"Your life, teachings and words still matter so much, Daddy. Congrats, Harry and Meghan!" Bernice King tweeted Saturday. "Bless you, Bishop Michael Curry."

Here's the full transcript of Curry's sermon:

And now in the name of our loving, liberating and life-giving God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Amen.

From the song of Solomon in the Bible: 'Set me as a seal upon your heart, as a seal upon your arm. For love is as strong as death. Passion, fierce as the grave. Its flashes are flashes of fire, a raging flame. Many waters cannot quench love. Neither can floods drown it out.'

The late Dr. Martin Luther King once said, and I quote: 'We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will make of this old world a new world. For love, love is the only way.'

There’s power in love. Don't underestimate it. Don't even over-sentimentalize it. There's power, power in love. If you don't believe me, think about a time when you first fell in love. The whole world seemed to center around you and your beloved. Well there's power, power in love. Not just in its romantic forms, but any form, any shape of love. There's a certain sense in which, when you are loved and you know it, when someone cares for you and you know it, when you love and you show it, it actually feels right. There's something right about it, and there's a reason for it. The reason has to do with the source. We were made by a power of love, and our lives were meant and are meant to be lived in that love. That's why we are here. Ultimately, the source of love is God himself. The source of all of our lies.

There's an old medieval poem that says: 'Where true love is found, God himself is there.'

The New Testament says it this way: 'Beloved, let us love one another because love is of God, and those who love are born of God and know God. Those who do not love do not know God. Why? For God is love.'

There’s power in love. There's power in love to help and heal when nothing else can. There's power in love to lift up and liberate when nothing else will. There's power in love to show us the way to live. Set me as a seal on your heart, a seal on your arm, for love is as strong as death.

But love is not only about a young couple. Now the power of love is demonstrated by the fact that we're all here. Two young people fell in love and we all showed up. But it's not just for and about a young couple for whom we rejoice with. It's more than that.

Jesus of Nazareth on one occasion was asked by a lawyer to sum up the essence of the teachings of Moses. And he went back and reached back into the Hebrew scriptures to Deuteronomy and Leviticus, and Jesus said: 'You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind and all your strength.' This is the first and great commandment, and the second is like it: 'Love your neighbor as yourself.'

And then in Matthew's version, he added, he said: 'On these two, love of God and love of neighbor, hang all the law, all the prophets, everything that Moses wrote, everything in the holy prophets, everything in the scriptures, everything that God has been trying to tell the world. Love God, love your neighbors. And while you're at it, love yourself.'

Someone once said that Jesus began the most revolutionary movement in all of human history. A movement grounded in the unconditional love of God for the world, and a movement mandating people to live that love. And in so doing, to change not only their lives but the very life of the world itself. I'm talking about some power. Real power. Power to change the world.

If you don't believe me, well, there was some old slaves in America's antebellum South who explained the dynamic power of love and why it has the power to transform. They explained it this way, they sang a spiritual, even in the midst of their captivity. It's one that says: 'There is a balm in Gilead.' A healing balm, something that can make things right. 'There is a balm in Gilead, to make the wounded whole. There is a balm in Gilead, to heal the sin-sick soul.' And one of the stanzas actually explains why. They said: 'If you cannot preach like Peter, and you cannot pray like Paul, you just tell the love of Jesus, how he died to save us all. That's the balm in Gilead.'

This way of love, it is the way of life. They got it. He died to save us all. He didn't die for anything he could get out of it. Jesus did not get an honorary doctorate for dying. He wasn't getting anything out of it. He gave up his life, he sacrificed his life for the good of others, for the good of the other, for the well-being of the world for us. That's what love is. Love is not selfish and self-centered. Love can be sacrificial and, in so doing, becomes redemptive.

And that way of unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive love changes lives, and it can change this world. If you don't believe me, just stop and think or imagine. Think and imagine. Well, think and imagine a world where love is the way. Imagine our homes and families when love is the way. Imagine neighborhoods and communities where love is the way. Imagine governments and nations where love is the way. Imagine business and commerce when love is the way. Imagine this tired, old world when love is the way.

When love is the way -- unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive -- when love is the way, then no child will go to bed hungry in this world ever again. When love is the way, we will let justice roll down like a mighty stream and righteousness like an ever-flowing brook. When love is the way, poverty will become history. When love is the way, the earth will be a sanctuary. When love is the way, we will lay down our swords and shields down by the riverside to study war no more. When love is the way, there's plenty good room, plenty good room for all of God's children.

Because when love is the way, we actually treat each other, well, like we are actually family. When love is the way, we know that God is the source of us all, and we are brothers and sisters, children of God. Brothers and sisters; that's a new heaven, a new earth, a new world, a new human family. And let me tell you something, ole Solomon was right in the Old Testament; that's fire.

Teilhard de Chardin -- and with this, I will sit down. We got to get you all married. French Jesuit Teilhard de Chardin was arguably one of the great minds, great spirits of the 20th century. A Jesuit, Roman Catholic priest, scientist, a scholar, a mystic. In some of his writings, he said, from his scientific background as well as his theological one -- in some of his writings, he said, as others have, that the discovery or invention or harnessing of fire was one of the great scientific and technological discoveries in all of human history. Fire, to a great extent, made human civilization possible. Fire made it possible to cook food and to provide sanitary ways of eating, which reduced the spread of disease in its time. Fire made it possible to heat warm environments, and thereby made human migration around the world a possibility, even into colder climates. Fire made it possible. There was no Bronze Age without fire, no Iron Age without fire, no Industrial Revolution without fire. The advances of science and technology are greatly dependent on the human ability and capacity to take fire and use it for human good.

Anyone get here in a car today? An automobile? Nod your heads if you did, I'm guessing. I know there were some carriages. But those of us who came in cars, fire -- the controlled, harnessed fire -- made that possible. I know that the Bible says, and I believe it, that Jesus walked on the water. But I have to tell you, I didn't walk across the Atlantic Ocean to get here. Controlled fire in that plane got me here. Fire makes it possible for us to text and tweet and email and Instagram and Facebook, and socially be dysfunctional with each other. Fire makes all of that possible, and Teilhard de Chardin said fire was one of the greatest discoveries in all of human history. And he then went on to say that if humanity ever harnesses the energy of fire again, if humanity ever captures the love, it will be the second time in history that we have discovered fire. Dr. King was right: 'We must discover love, the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will make of this old world, a new world.'

Our brother, my sister, God love you, God bless you. And may God hold us all in those almighty hands of love.

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Anwar Hussein/WireImage(WINDSOR, England) -- The late Princess Diana was honored and there in spirit at the wedding of her son Harry and his bride, Meghan Markle, in St. George's Chapel on Saturday.

Harry handpicked several flowers on Friday from the private garden at Kensington Palace, including forget-me-nots, which were his late mother's favorite flower.

The couple specifically chose them to be included in Markle’s bouquet to honor Diana's memory, according to Buckingham Palace.

Diana, a humanitarian known to the world as the "People's Princess," died in a car crash in 1997 when she was 36 years old. She left behind a rich legacy of humanitarian and advocacy work and is widely admired for alleviating the stigma surrounding AIDS when photos of her shaking hands with AIDS patients were seen worldwide.

The influence of Diana was also felt Saturday at the wedding ceremony when her sister, Lady Jane Fellowes, delivered the reading.

Harry has previously said he thinks his late mother would have gotten along well with Markle.

"Oh, they'd be thick as thieves, without question. I think she would be over the moon," Harry said in an interview with the BBC shortly after the couple announced their engagement.

He added that he thinks his mom "would have probably been best friends" with Markle.

Markle added, "She's with us."

Moreover, the couple paid tribute to Diana with Markle's wedding ring, which includes diamonds from the late princess' jewelry collection.
 
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Jonathan Brady/WPA Pool/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will add new pieces of jewelry to their collections on Saturday.

The soon-to-be married couple will exchange wedding rings crafted in the Cleave workshop, the same company called upon last year to create Markle's engagement ring.

As is the royal tradition, the bride-to-be's ring has been created from a piece of Welsh gold, and was a gift from Queen Elizabeth II.

Prince Harry, 33, and Meghan Markle, 36, will wed Saturday morning at St. George's Chapel in Windsor.

Celebrity guests include the likes of Oprah Winfrey, George and Amal Clooney, and Victoria and David Beckham. Several members of the royal family will also attend, including Prince George and Princess Charlotte, with Prince William having been tapped as best man. He will be responsible for carrying the rings to the ceremony.

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Andrew Matthews/WPA Pool/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- Meghan Markle, now Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Sussex, has married her prince.

Markle, 36, wore a white wedding dress designed by Clare Waight Keller, the first female artistic director at French fashion house Givenchy, at her wedding to Prince Harry, the sixth in line to the British throne.

She was escorted up the steps of St. George’s Chapel by two of the page boys -- Brian and John Mulroney, the 7-year-old twins of Markle’s close friend, Jessica Mulroney, and her husband, Ben Mulroney.

Markle's new father-in-law, Prince Charles, walked Markle from the quire -- the area of St. George’s Chapel where the clergy and choir sit -- to Harry. The procession in the nave, the central part of the church, included the Dean of Windsor, Markle’s bridesmaids and page boys.

Harry, 33, dressed in military uniform, held the hand of his bride, whose face was at first covered by a veil held in place by Queen Mary's diamond bandeau tiara, lent to Markle by Queen Elizabeth.

Harry arrived at St. George's Chapel with his brother, Prince William, who also served as best man.

Markle arrived at Windsor Castle with her mother, Doria Ragland, 61, who wore a mint green dress. The mother and daughter traveled to Windsor Castle in a chauffeured Rolls Royce.

Ragland, seated near the Mulroneys and Charlie van Straubenzee, one of Harry's best friends, was seen tearing up as she watched her daughter at the altar.

Absent from the wedding service was Markle's father, Thomas Markle Sr. Markle confirmed in a statement that her dad, who lives in Mexico, would not attend the wedding due to health concerns.

Harry's royal relatives -- including Queen Elizabeth, Prince Philip, Prince Charles, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, Prince William and Princess Kate -- were seated near the altar.

The influence of Harry's late mother, Princess Diana, was felt when her sister, Lady Jane Fellowes, delivered the reading.

Harry also handpicked several flowers on Friday from the private garden at Kensington Palace, including forget-me-nots, which were Diana's favorite flower. The couple specifically chose them to be included in Markle’s bouquet to honor Diana's memory, according to Buckingham Palace.

Prince William and Princess Kate's children -- Prince George and Princess Charlotte -- were among the bridesmaids and page boys who surrounded Markle and Harry on their wedding day.

Joining Charlotte and George in the wedding party were Ivy Mulroney, the 4-year-old sister of Brian and John Mulroney.

Jasper Dyer, the 6-year-old son of Harry's mentor and close friend, Capt. Mark Dyer, was the fourth page boy.

The page boys wore a miniature version of the Blues and Royals frockcoat.

"The uniform draws its insignia from the Blues and Royals, which is an old Regiment of The Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry," according to Buckingham Palace. "Both are also wearing Blues and Royals frockcoats for the wedding day."

Two of Harry's goddaughters -- 3-year-old Florence van Cutsem and 2-year-old Zalie Warren -- and two of Markle's goddaughters -- 7-year-old Rylan Litt and her 6-year-old sister, Remi Litt -- were also bridesmaids.

The bridesmaids' dresses were also designed by Clare Waight Keller in the Givenchy Haute Couture Atelier in Paris, according to Buckingham Palace. Their white leather Aquazurra shoes are each monogrammed with their initials and the wedding date, a gift from Markle as a "keepsake of the special day."

Markle and Harry said their wedding vows in front of around 600 guests, including Oprah Winfrey, Elton John, Serena Williams, Idris Elba, James Corden, James Blunt, George and Amal Clooney, and David and Victoria Beckham.

The Right Rev. David Conner, the dean of Windsor, conducted the wedding service. The Most Rev. Justin Welby, the archbishop of Canterbury, who baptized and confirmed Markle, officiated the couple's marriage vows.

The U.S.-based Most Reverend Michael Bruce Curry, the 27th Presiding Bishop and Primate of The Episcopal Church, delivered a soul-stirring wedding address that quoted Martin Luther King Jr.

It was announced before the wedding that Henry would be conferred a dukedom by the queen, officially taking on the title Duke of Sussex, Earl of Dumbarton and Baron Kilkeel. Markle's official title will be Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Sussex.

The last American to marry into Britain’s royal family was Wallis Simpson, who married the Duke of Windsor in 1937.

Markle and Harry have made their wedding their own, choosing to fill St. George’s Chapel with floral displays of white garden roses, foxgloves and peonies -- Markle’s favorite bloom -- as well as local branches of beech, birch, and hornbeam, designed by florist Philippa Craddock.

Markle personally asked a 19-year-old cellist, Sheku Kanneh-Mason, to provide music for the service, along with an organist and trumpet players, a full orchestra and a soprano. A U.K.-based gospel choir, the Kingdom Choir, led by Karen Gibson, sang Stand By Me.

Following the hourlong wedding service, Harry and Markle left St. George's Chapel in a carriage procession that left Windsor Castle via Castle Hill and continued along High Street through Windsor Town before returning to Windsor Castle on a route called the Long Walk.

Harry and Markle invited 2,640 people onto the grounds of Windsor Castle to see the wedding carriage procession as it departed.

Members of the public were selected from different regions of the U.K. with a special emphasis on those who have served their community.

The couple also invited 100 students from two local schools in Windsor that have a strong affiliation with Windsor Castle, as well as 200 individuals who take part in charities and organizations for which Harry serves as royal patron.

A royal love story

Harry proposed to Markle in November at Nottingham Cottage, the two-bedroom home the couple shares at Kensington Palace.

The couple made their first public appearance as an engaged couple on Nov. 27, 2017, the day their engagement was formally announced.

Markle is a divorcee whose first marriage -- to film producer Trevor Engelson -- ended in 2013. This is the first time Harry is getting married.

The couple were introduced in the summer of 2016 by a mutual friend who set them up on a blind date.

Just four weeks after their first date, Harry and Markle spent five days camping out "under the stars" in Botswana, they said in their first post-engagement interview.

Their relationship crisscrossed the globe, with Markle visiting Harry in London and Harry traveling to visit Markle in Toronto, where she filmed the TV drama Suits.

Four months into the relationship, Harry's communication secretary issued a statement to condemn the “wave of abuse and harassment” the palace said Markle had been subjected to in the press.

The statement noted the “racial undertones of comment pieces; and the outright sexism and racism of social media trolls and web article comments.”

Markle is biracial -- the daughter of a white father and African-American mother. She was raised by both parents, who are divorced, in the Los Angeles area.

Markle went on to an acting career, with her most notable role in Suits. She has said her marriage marks a "new chapter" in her life where she'll be working with Harry "as a team," and no longer acting.

In the months following their engagement, Harry and Markle embarked on a tour of the United Kingdom, introducing Markle to her new home and the charities that Harry supports.

Markle, who was known for her humanitarian work prior to meeting Harry, will join him, Prince William and Princess Kate as a patron of the Royal Foundation.

"We're a fantastic team," Harry said in November of his relationship with Markle. "We know we are, and we hope to over time try and have as much impact for all the things that we care about as much as possible."

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Jonathan Brady/WPA Pool/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- Prince Harry and Meghan Markle received not only wedding rings on Saturday, but also new titles.

Queen Elizabeth has conferred a dukedom on Harry, the sixth in line to the British throne.

The title is considered a gift from Queen Elizabeth, Harry's grandmother.

When Harry's older brother, Prince William, the second in line to the throne, married Kate Middleton in 2011, the couple became the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

On their children's birth certificates, William identified his occupation and Kate's as the Prince of the United Kingdom and the Princess of the United Kingdom, respectively, so Kate is also called Princess Kate.

If Prince Charles -- William and Harry's father -- becomes king, William will then become the Prince of Wales.

Harry, sixth in line to the throne, is more likely to keep his dukedom, leaving Markle as a duchess in Britain's royal family.

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Richard Heathcote/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- Meghan Markle was a vision in white as she walked down the aisle to Prince Harry.

As the bride walked into St. George's Chapel on Saturday, in front of more than 2,000 guests and millions watching around the world, she wore Queen Mary's tiara -- lent to Markle by Queen Elizabeth -- complete with a veil. The actual tiara, which features a diamond bandeau, was crafted in 1932.

Her signature messy bun was polished into a low chignon, and Markle had short nude-polished nails as she waved to crowds while entering the chapel.

The three-quarter-length wedding gown, designed by Clare Waight Keller, featured a scoop neck and an A-line silhouette. Keller, 47, became the first-female artistic director to head the house of Givenchy.

Markle's mother, Doria Ragland, who walked in ahead of the bride, wrote mint green, with a silver hat that complimented the look.

Queen Elizabeth also wore the color green, opting instead for a lime green suit with matching hat that featured a royal purple ascent.

Previously, it was rumored that British design duo Ralph & Russo would have the honor of designing Markle's wedding dress. She selected the Australian-born designers, Tamara Ralph and Michael Russo, to wear for her engagement photos to Prince Harry last December.

That floor-length gown was semi-sheer with hints of gold leaves, creating a winsome look. The top is paired with a feathered semi-sheer skit.

Other designs rumored to be in the running to design Markle's dress have included Christopher Bailey, the man behind the iconic British brand Burberry; British designer Stella McCartney; Canadian designer Erdem Moralioglu; and Roland Mouret, a close friend of the former actress.

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Sanp Pompeii Handout/EPA/Shutterstock(POMPEII, Italy) -- Mt. Vesuvius, near the city of Pompeii, Italy, erupted in 79 A.D., wiping out an entire town. Hundreds of years later, archaeologists found a perfectly preserved city buried in ash and frozen in time.

Just recently, an extraordinary discovery was unearthed in a large villa that stood just outside the walls of Pompeii, far from the known archaeological area, during a joint operation of the Carabinieri of the Cultural Heritage Protection Center and Pompeii archaeological superintendence.

Archaeologists working at the site uncovered buildings with big balconies, Pompeian red colors and geometric decorations of flowers and animals. They named it the Vicolo dei Balconi (Alley of Balconies). The area was previously unexcavated.

As the work continues, another previously discovered area, The Domus delle Nozze d' Argento, will be viewable once again. The most precious domus (dwelling) of the ancient Roman city in Pompeii, discovered and restored between 1893 and 1910, has been closed to the public for decades. The director of the archaeological park of Pompeii, Massimo Osanna, announced the restorations of the Domus will start, which will "finally allow" the reopening the site to the public in fall 2019.

The Domus has a huge and sumptuous atrium with four Corinthian columns more than 26 feet high, multicolored frescoes, refined floors and a small private spa decorated with mosaics and frescoes depicting lions, wild boars and panthers.

Almost 2,000 years after the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius and decades of excavation, the newly restored areas will be on view to tourists who want a deeper insight into Roman life from years long gone.

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FilmColoratStudio/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Three explosions targeted a cricket tournament in Afghanistan Friday, leaving eight people dead and dozens injured, according to a government official.

The explosions took place in the eastern Jalalabad province and reportedly targeted the Naya Nazimabad Ramzan Cup cricket tournament.

Nangarhar governor's spokesman Attaullah Khogyani said Friday that eight people were killed in the blasts and 42 others were injured.

Khogyani said that the organizer of the cricket game, Hidayatullah Zaheer, and at least one child were among the eight fatalities.

No further information was disclosed about the types of explosions or what caused the blasts.

This is a breaking news story. Please check back for updates.

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