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carlballou/iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Speaking publicly for the first time since the deadly officer-involved shooting, Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau said Thursday the killing of Australian woman Justine Ruszczyk didn’t need to happen.

The 40-year-old "didn't have to die," Harteau said of the July 15 shooting incident.

The Minneapolis Police Department squad cars are adorned with the lines, "To protect with courage" and "To serve with compassion," Harteau said.

"This did not happen," she added Thursday evening. "It goes against who we are as a department, how we train and our expectations for our officers."

Harteau said the incident was the result of the “actions and judgment of one individual and that she believes the body cams should have been activated."

The department had only had the body cameras for eight months, so it was “not second nature” for them, she said.

Harteau faced criticism for her notable absence in the days following Ruszczyk's death, but she told reporters Thursday that she was in a remote area, "backpacking in the mountains," which made it difficult for her to return. She was scheduled to return on Aug. 1, she said.

Harteau said she also spoke to Ruszczyk's fiance, Don Damond, and the two had a "positive conversation" on how to move things forward.

On Wednesday, the Minneapolis Police Department released transcripts from Ruszczyk’s Saturday’s 911 call, detailing what she believed was a sexual assault occurring near her home in Minneapolis' Fulton neighborhood.

"I can hear someone out the back and I -- I'm not sure if she's having sex or being raped," Ruszczyk tells the 911 operator, according to the transcript released by police.

Once two officers -- identified as Matthew Harrity and Mohamed Noor -- arrived at Ruszczyk's home, she approached the driver's side of the squad car, just after Harrity heard a loud sound near the car, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety.

Noor, who was sitting in the passenger seat, then fired his weapon through the open driver's side window, the DPS said. Ruszczyk was pronounced dead at the scene.

Noor has not made any statements to investigators, Harteau said.

“I would prefer Officer Noor speak,” she said.



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ABC News(CARSON CITY, Nev.) -- O.J. Simpson, who was granted parole Thursday after nearlynine years in prison for a Las Vegas robbery, will soon be a free man.

The imprisoned former NFL player could be released from Lovelock Correctional Facility in Nevada as early as Oct. 1.

Here's what we know about what his life may be like going forward.

The rest of his time in prison should continue as usual, an official said Thursday, and officials will work on developing his release plan.

Simpson, 70, is requesting to live in Florida, where he has family as his support system, officials said today.

Simpson quipped to the parole board Thursday, "Stay in Nevada? I don't think you guys want me here."

Simpson told the commissioners that he's missed 36 birthdays with his children while behind bars and missed their college graduations, and if he was to be paroled, he said he wants to spend as much time as he can with his family.

Simpson's eldest daughter, Arnelle Simpson, spoke at the parole hearing, appearing emotional and telling the board the family wants him home so they can move forward.

Officials said Thursday if Florida denies Simpson's request, officials in Nevada would work with him to develop a different suitable plan.

Simpson was sentenced to prison following an arrest in 2007 during a botched robbery in Las Vegas, when he led a group of men into a hotel and casino to steal sports memorabilia at gunpoint. He contended the memorabilia and other personal items belonged to him.

Simpson delivered a rambling account of the case to the parole board, maintaining that he didn’t intend to steal but “wish this would have never happened.”

More than 20 years ago, Simpson went on trial for the killing of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ron Goldman. The two were found on June 12, 1994, stabbed to death at her Los Angeles home. On Oct. 3, 1995, at the end of a televised trial that captivated the nation, Simpson was acquitted of all criminal charges. He has always maintained his innocence.

Hours before the parole hearing, Ron Goldman's father, Fred Goldman, told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos on Good Morning America, "What's troubling to me is not only him, but the whole system gives second chances to violent felons or, for that matter, anyone in jail. ... Ron doesn't get a second chance.

"Ron never gets to spend his life doing what he wanted to do," Fred Goldman continued. "We'll never get to share his life, and the killer will walk free and get to do whatever he wants."

Fred Goldman said the parole board should take into account that Simpson was found liable for the killings in the 1997 civil trial.

"I think his whole history of violence, ignoring the law, no respect for the law, no remorse for virtually anything he's ever done is an indication of who he is as a person," Fred Goldman said. "I don’t think there's any reason to think that he's going to be a decent human being in society. I think he's proved otherwise."

Added Ron Goldman's sister, Kim Goldman, "We lived our life with [Simpson] walking the streets and sharing the same roads that we did."

"With him being locked up in Lovelock, it's been a chance for us to kind of reclaim some control over our life and have some glimpse of sanity," she said. "I'm preparing myself for that to be changing come October."

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Credit: Bucks County D.A.'s Office(BENSALEM, Pa.) -- One of the suspects charged in the slayings of four young men in southeastern Pennsylvania had at least 40 prior encounters with local police in recent years, officials said.

Police in Bensalem Township said they have had contact with Cosmo DiNardo 40 times since 2011 when he was 14 years old. But that total includes inconsequential contacts such as when DiNardo happened to be at his family's home when the burglary alarm went off, according to Fred Harran, director of public safety with the Bensalem Township Police Department.

"We document everything," Harran told ABC News in a telephone interview Thursday.

The majority of the police contacts with the now 20-year-old DiNardo, a Bensalem resident, involved calls about: concerns over his mental health, domestic incidents, DiNardo's alleged improper riding of an ATV, and traffic citations. Other police contacts with DiNardo included when there was a report of a suspicious vehicle and disturbance at his high school and DiNardo, who was allegedly behaving in a loud and disorderly manner on school grounds, was asked to leave, according to Harran.

But none of these prior encounters resulted in any arrests of DiNardo, police said.

DiNardo's first arrest came Monday, July 10, the same day that authorities investigating the disappearances of four young men executed a search warrant at a vast Solebury Township property owned by DiNardo's parents.

DiNardo was arrested that day on a charge stemming from illegally possessing a shotgun and ammunition back in February. The following day, July 11, he was named a person of interest in connection with the men's disappearances but was released from jail after meeting bail.

The day after that, July 12, DiNardo, facing accusations that he had taken the car of one of the missing men, Thomas Meo, was taken back into custody.

Subsequently both DiNardo and Sean Kratz, 20, of Philadelphia, who was also arrested, were charged with criminal homicide in the July 7 deaths of Dean Finocchiaro, 19, of Middletown Township, Meo, 21, of Plumstead Township, and Mark Sturgis, 22, of Pennsburg.

Investigators found the bodies of the three men Wednesday in a roughly 12-foot-deep grave on a sprawling property in Solebury Township owned by DiNardo's parents, according to the Bucks County District Attorney's Office.

DiNardo is also accused of killing Jimi Tar Patrick, 19, of Newtown Township, on July 5, and burying him in a single grave elsewhere on the same property.

Both men have pleaded not guilty to the charges against them.

According to court documents obtained by ABC News, DiNardo told detectives he used a backhoe to dig both graves.

Patrick went missing July 5, while Finocchiaro, Meo and Sturgis all disappeared July 7. All four men were shot and each victim has been positively identified. Their family members have been briefed on details of the case, according to the district attorney's office.

Court documents show DiNardo and Kratz also face multiple counts of conspiracy, robbery and abuse of a corpse.

DiNardo and Kratz have each provided statements to investigators, and DiNardo has described Kratz as his cousin, according to the district attorney's office.

At a July 14 news conference, Bucks County District Attorney Matthew Weintraub said he made an "agreement" with DiNardo that allowed investigators to locate Patrick's body, which was buried as far as a half-mile away from where the three other bodies were found. The agreement includes not seeking the death penalty, Weintraub said.

When asked about a motive, Weintraub told reporters, "I don't know that, and I'm not sure we'll ever know."

DiNardo and Kratz were arraigned July 14 before Magisterial District Judge Maggie Snow of Buckingham Township. Neither were able to post bail. They are scheduled for a July 31 preliminary hearing before Snow.

Harran also said there was no way to have known from DiNardo's prior contacts with law enforcement that he would later be accused of horrific murders.

The public safety director added, however, that the police department had not been aware of DiNardo's prior, court-ordered mental health treatment.

“The lack of coordination on mental health is a problem in this country,” Harran told ABC News.

“There’s no database to tell us he was 302’d,” he added, using a Pennsylvania legal term for court-ordered mental health treatment. “There are [others] walking all over the streets. I’ve got six more like him.”

In hindsight, Harran said, "Maybe [DiNardo] should have been in for a little bit longer than he was in for, as far as mental health."

Regardless, Harran said it's crucial for law enforcement to be made aware when someone they've received calls about repeatedly is evaluated for potential psychiatric issues. In DiNardo's case, Harran said there were clues that "the guy's got problems" but police did not know enough to realize he may later be charged with killing.

“There’s a gap,” Harran told ABC News. “And we’re always the ones holding the bag. We’re out here dealing with people. People are always afraid of information police are going to learn about them. It’s not like we open up a phone book and start running people. We don’t have time for that. We only look at it when we need it.”

One of DiNardo's defense attorneys, Paul Lang, told reporters last week that DiNardo confessed to killing the four men and gave authorities the location of the bodies.

The motive for the killings will come out in time, the lawyer said.

DiNardo felt "deep remorse" and is "very emotional," Lang told ABC News.

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ABC News(LOVELOCK, Nev.) --  O.J. Simpson has been granted parole after nine years in prison for a Las Vegas robbery, a group of Nevada commissioners decided Thursday.

The imprisoned former NFL player could be released as early as Oct. 1.

Simpson, 70, faced the parole board Thursday, delivering a rambling account of the case in which he maintained that he didn’t intend to steal but “wish this would have never happened.”

Simpson was at times jovial and combative with the members of the parole board, expressing his remorse and saying he's humbled by his incarceration. Simpson was sentenced to prison following an arrest in 2007 during a botched robbery in Las Vegas, when he led a group of men into a hotel and casino to steal sports memorabilia at gunpoint. He contended the memorabilia and other personal items belonged to him.

Simpson said, "I take full responsibility."

Simpson appeared remotely via video conference from Lovelock Correctional Facility in Nevada, where he's serving time for kidnapping and armed robbery. Simpson began by explaining what he said led to crime, telling the board how he learned that some "some guys" were trying to "fence" what he said were his personal mementos in Las Vegas.

"As a perfect storm we all ended up in Las Vegas, you know? I was there for a wedding and [was told that] the property was there."

He later continued, "I said, 'Of course I would like to get the property.' He told me the names of what he thought were the people in the room, and I realized these are friends of mine. You know? Actually guys who helped me move, helped me move and store some of this stuff."

Simpson explained, "When I came into the [hotel] room I noticed spread out everywhere was my personal property."

"The only thing I saw that was on display that wasn't mine was some baseballs, and I made it clear to everybody those are not mine. All I want is my property. ... I wasn't there to steal from anybody."

"I would never, ever pull a weapon," he said.

Simpson added, "I haven't made any excuses in the nine years I've been here and not trying to make an excuses now."

When asked if he believed that the property was his, Simpson replied, "It's been ruled legally by the state of California that it was my property and they've given it to me."

Simpson reassured the board he would be successful meeting the conditions of his parole if granted, saying, "I'm not a guy who lived a criminal life."

Simpson said in his nine years behind bars, he's been "a good guy."

"I was always a good guy, but could have been a better Christian, and my commitment to change is to be a better Christian."

He said he took an "alternative to violence" course in prison, and called it "the most important course anybody in this prison can take because it teaches you how to deal with conflict through conversation."

"I had some problems with fidelity in my life, but I've always been a guy that pretty much got along with everybody," he said.

Simpson said he's missed 36 birthdays with his children while behind bars and missed their college graduations, and if he is paroled, he said he wants to spend as much time as he can with his family.

During the hearing, Simpson's attorney, Malcolm LaVergne, planned to read to the board a letter Simpson wrote to a Nevada assemblyman, but LaVergne had difficulty finding it and asked Simpson in front of the commissioners, "Did you take the letter? I can't find it now."

He then located the letter and read it to the board; in the letter, Simpson advocates for state funds to go toward education for inmates.

LaVergne then argued to the board that Simpson's letter didn't ask for special treatment or an early release, but instead showed how Simpson wants to help other inmates have "a better life."

Simpson's eldest daughter, Arnelle Simpson, also spoke at the hearing, appearing emotional as she told the board, her father is her "best friend" and her "rock."

"No one really knows how much we have been through, this ordeal in the last nine years," she said, noting that "he didn't make the right decision" on the day of the robbery.

"We just want him to come home," she said. "This has been really, truly hard. ... I know that he is remorseful."

Bruce Fromong, one of the robbed memorabilia dealers and a victim in the case, spoke in Simpson’s favor at the hearing. He admitted the hotel room did contain items that belong to Simpson, but said that on the day of the robbery, "Simpson was misguided."

Fromong continued, "He was led to believe that on that day, there were going to be thousands of pieces of his personal memorabilia, pictures of his wife from his first marriage, pictures of his kids. He was told there were going to be possibly his wife's wedding ring, thousands of things. He was misled about what was going to be there that day."

"O.J. never held a gun on me," Fromong said. "O.J. is my friend, always has been, and I hope will remain my friend."

Simpson's football career took him from the University of Southern California to the Buffalo Bills. Following his retirement, his celebrity status catapulted him to movie stardom and a cushy Brentwood, California, mansion.

More than 20 years ago, Simpson went on trial for the killing of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ron Goldman. The two were found on June 12, 1994, stabbed to death at her Los Angeles home. On Oct. 3, 1995, at the end of a televised trial that captivated the nation, Simpson was acquitted of all criminal charges. He has always maintained his innocence.

A civil jury later ordered Simpson to pay $33.5 million in damages after finding him liable for wrongful death in the double murder.

For the 2007 robbery, Simpson was charged with a number of felony counts, including kidnapping and armed robbery. He was found guilty and sentenced to up to 33 years in prison.

His bid for a new trial in the case was rejected in 2013, but he was granted parole that same year on some of the charges, based on good behavior. He was not released from prison at that time, since his prison sentences were set to run consecutively. Simpson had to wait until this year to appear again before the parole board.

Simpson’s friend, Tom Scotto, told ABC News earlier this year that Simpson is "hopeful." Scotto said if Simpson is freed, he would want "to just keep a low profile, be with his kids, be with his family, play golf."

Hours before the parole hearing, Ron Goldman's father, Fred Goldman, told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos on Good Morning America, "What's troubling to me is not only him, but the whole system gives second chances to violent felons or, for that matter, anyone in jail. ... Ron doesn't get a second chance.

"Ron never gets to spend his life doing what he wanted to do," Fred Goldman continued. "We'll never get to share his life, and the killer will walk free and get to do whatever he wants."

Fred Goldman said the parole board should take into account that Simpson was found liable for the killings in the 1997 civil trial.

"I think his whole history of violence, ignoring the law, no respect for the law, no remorse for virtually anything he's ever done is an indication of who he is as a person," Fred Goldman said. "I don’t think there's any reason to think that he's going to be a decent human being in society. I think he's proved otherwise."

Added Ron Goldman's sister, Kim Goldman, "We lived our life with [Simpson] walking the streets and sharing the same roads that we did."

"With him being locked up in Lovelock, it's been a chance for us to kind of reclaim some control over our life and have some glimpse of sanity," she said. "I'm preparing myself for that to be changing come October."

This story is developing. Please check back for more updates


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Photo by Jason Bean-Pool/Getty Images(CARSON CITY, Nev.) -- O.J. Simpson's eldest daughter made an impassioned plea at his parole hearing in Nevada Thursday, urging the board to let her father come home.

"No one really knows how much we have been through, this ordeal in the last nine years," Arnelle Simpson said in a statement to the board, noting that her father "didn't make the right decision" on the day of the robbery in September 2007, for which he is currently serving prison time.

Arnelle Simpson, appearing emotional, described her father as her "best friend" and her "rock."

"We just want him to come home," the 48-year-old said. "This has been really, truly hard. ... I know that he is remorseful."

Simpson, 70, is currently serving time in Lovelock Correctional Facility in Nevada for kidnapping and armed robbery.

The Nevada Board of Parole Commissioners will determine and announce his fate later on Thursday.


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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Hours before O.J. Simpson is to go before a Nevada parole board, Fred and Kim Goldman, the father and sister of Ron Goldman, spoke out and said they may never see justice for the killing of their family member.

"Ron never gets to spend his life doing what he wanted to do," a tearful Fred Goldman told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos Thursday on Good Morning America. "We'll never get to share his life, and the killer will walk free and get to do whatever he wants."

Stephanopoulos asked the Goldmans if they think they may ever see justice.

We'll "probably never see that ... never get the justice," Fred Goldman said.

Fred and Kim Goldman were present as Simpson stood trial for the 1994 killing of Ron Goldman and the football star's wife, Nicole Brown Simpson.

Simpson was acquitted of charges in both killings but in an unrelated case he is serving a 33-year sentence at Lovelock Correctional Center in Lovelock, Nevada in connection with a kidnapping and armed robbery.

Simpson has so far served nine years and will have a parole hearing Thursday in which case, the former Heisman trophy winner could walk free.

Craig Arnett, a former guard at Lovelock Correctional, described Simpson as a model prisoner.

"He's still an inmate, but he definitely wasn't a problem child like some of the other ones were," Arnett told ABC News Wednesday. "I think he has a strong chance of getting out. I think he hasn't really been a problem in prison."

If Simpson is granted parole, his earliest possible release date is Oct. 1.

Denial could mean at least another three years behind bars.

ABC will have live coverage of Simpson's parole hearing Thursday at 1 p.m. Eastern.

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Arapahoe County Sheriff's Office(AURORA, Colo.) -- It was a cool summer night on July 20, 2012 in Aurora, Colorado as Batman fans took their seats at the Century 16 movie theater for a midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises.

The highly anticipated third installment of the Batman trilogy opened to packed auditoriums at midnight showings across the country, but little did the moviegoers in Aurora know that their attendance to see the summer blockbuster would come to a terrible conclusion in real life.

Five years later, here is a look back at the devastating shooting that shocked a nation:

Shooter James Holmes purchased four guns prior to the massacre

In the 60 days leading up to the shooting, Holmes had purchased four guns from local shops and more than 6,000 rounds of ammunition, police said at the time.

All of the weapons and ammunition were purchased legally, police said.

Sold-out midnight premiere of The Dark Knight Rises

Holmes had bought a ticket to the movie before slipping out and propping an emergency exit open, federal law enforcement sources told ABC News.

About 30 minutes into the movie, Holmes had gathered his weapons and re-entered the movie auditorium through the emergency exit wearing a ballistics helmet, bulletproof vest, bulletproof leggings, a gas mask and gloves.

Holmes then detonated multiple smoke bombs before he unloaded four weapons' full of ammunition into the unsuspecting crowd of hundreds of attendees, police said.

12 people were killed, dozens more injured

Ten victims died at the scene, while another two died at local hospitals. Among the dead was a 6-year-old girl.

Seventy people were injured in the ordeal, police said. Most were injured by gunfire, but a "handful" were injured during the chaos that ensued. One injured victim was hit by gunfire in an adjacent theater.

A 3-month-old was among those taken to the University of Colorado Hospital, but he or she was quickly discharged, Dr. Comilla Sasson told ABC News at the time. Twenty-two victims were taken to University of Colorado Hospital that night.

At the time, the massacre was the deadliest shooting since the Columbine High School shooting in 1999.

Witnesses recall the horror

Witnesses said they thought the smoke and gunshots were part of the movie until they saw Holmes standing in front of the screen.

"You just smelled smoke and you just kept hearing it, you just heard bam bam bam, non-stop," one witness told ABC News in 2012. "The gunman never had to reload. Shots just kept going, kept going, kept going."

Moviegoer Christopher Ramos told ABC News in 2012 that "people were running everywhere," including on top of him, and called the shooting a "real-life nightmare."

"I froze up. I was scared," Ramos said. "I honestly thought I was going to die."

Some lied on the ground to protect themselves.

"I'm with coworkers and we're on the floor praying to God we don't get shot, and the gunshots continue on and on, and when the sound finally stopped, we started to get up and people were just bleeding," another theatergoer said at the time.

At one point, Holmes exited the theater, only to wait outside and shoot patrons as they attempted to flee, witness Jennifer Seeger said on ABC News' Good Morning America after the shooting.

Holmes arrested nearby within minutes of the shooting


Police apprehended Holmes in his car behind the theater within minutes of the shooting. He was found in full riot gear and carrying three weapons, including an AR-15 assault rifle, a Remington 12-gauge shotgun, and a .40 caliber Glock handgun. A fourth handgun was also found inside the vehicle.

Holmes told arresting officers that he was "The Joker," referring to the villain in the second installment of the Batman movie trilogy, The Dark Knight.

Holmes had booby-trapped his apartment

When Holmes was arrested, he warned police that he had booby-trapped his apartment.

The next day, police, bomb squads and agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives found a large number of explosive devices and trip wires at Holmes' apartment.

At first, Hazmat teams had to proceed searching Holmes' apartment with caution, since the materials could have blown up Holmes' apartment building and the ones near it, police said.

Video from a bomb squad robot showed gun powder, gasoline and motor oil scattered across Holmes' apartment floor. The video also revealed dozens of black spheres with fuses all connected to them and pickle jars filled with liquid and bullets inside of them.

The first booby trap was a trip-wire made of fishing line with one end connected to the door jam and the other connected to a thermos, said Richard Orman, senior deputy district attorney for the 18th Judicial District of Colorado. The thermos had a bottle of nearly pure glycerin perched precariously on a frying pan that contained the chemical potassium permanganate.

If the glycerin had fallen in, it would have ignited an explosion big enough to blow up the entire apartment, Orman said in 2015 following the release of an FBI report.

More than 20 bombs and incendiaries were found in the apartment.

Holmes sentenced to life in prison without parole

On Aug. 7, 2015, more than three years after the shooting, Holmes was sentenced to life in prison without parole.

Holmes avoided the death penalty because the jury could not come to a unanimous decision.

In July 2015, Holmes was found guilty of all charges against him, included two counts of first-degree murder for each of the deceased victims and two counts of attempted murder for reach of the 70 others who were injured but survived.

Holmes had admitted to the killings but argued that he was not guilty by reason of insanity. His attorneys pushed for him to be committed to a mental hospital for the rest of his life. State prosecutors sought the death penalty.

What we know about Holmes' past

Holmes was originally from Riverside, California and attended the University of California branch there, Aurora Police Chief Dan Oates said after the shooting.

Neighbors had reported that Holmes lived alone and kept to himself, Oates said.

Prior to the massacre, Holmes was an honors student and Ph.D. candidate at the University of Colorado medical center, authorities said. He had a clear arrest record.

An acquaintance of Holmes said he did not show any anger or anti-social tendencies in the days before the shooting.

"He seemed kind of geeky," said Jackie Mitchell, who lived a block away from Holmes in Aurora. "We just talked about football ... that kind of thing."

Another neighbor, Kaitlyn Fonzi, who lived directly below Holmes, said she heard loud techno music coming from his apartment the night of the shooting.

Psychology experts at the time told ABC News that while it's hard to know what Holmes' state of mind was before the rampage, certain details, such has him referring to himself as "the Joker," suggest that he was a deeply disturbed individual.

After the shooting, Holmes' mother and her husband released a statement saying their "hearts go out to those involved in this tragedy and to the families and friends of those involved."

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iStock/Thinkstock(PAYSON, Ariz.) -- The remains found near a debris-filled creek in central Arizona on Wednesday night are believed to be those of a 27-year-old man who went missing after a deadly flash flood over the weekend.

The Gila County Sheriff’s office said it located remains near the Shoo Fly Creek that are "believed to be related to the search" for Hector Garnica, who went missing Saturday after torrential rains flooded the Cold Springs swimming hole near Payson, Arizona, where he and his family were celebrating his wife's birthday.

Garnica’s wife, Maria Garnica, and their three children -- Danny, 7; Mia, 5; and Emily, 3 -- were carried away and killed in the flood. Five other members of the family were also killed; four family members were rescued.

Gila County Sheriff J. Adam Shepherd called the investigation "open and very complex" at a Wednesday evening press conference where he said the remains would be examined to confirm the victim’s identity.

"We are working with the dept. of public safety to do a DNA analysis on the remains to make sure that this is the individual that we’re looking for," Shepherd said, "and of course that being our tenth victim to this situation, Hector Garnica."

Hector Garnica’s family announced earlier on Wednesday that funeral services for the nine relatives who died in the flood would be held early next week. Only four of the 14 family members who were swimming at the creek were rescued, officials said.

Shepherd confirmed that the family had been notified about the remains.

"We have been working with the family," Shepherd said Wednesday. "They have been notified and we have been talking to them."

Authorities said a Department of Public Safety helicopter crew spotted the remains on the side of the East Verde River as they were mapping out a search plan.

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iStock/Thinkstock(SALEM, Mass.) -- A memorial to people who were executed on charges of witchcraft 325 years ago was unveiled on Wednesday in Salem, Massachusetts.

In 1692, Sarah Good, Rebecca Nurse, Susannah Martin and 15 others were hung at the location known as Procter’s Ledge, while another victim, Giles Corey, was crushed to death.

The executions were part of a mass hysteria in colonial Massachusetts in which some local people were accused of practicing witchcraft. City officials are now trying to move past their city’s dark history in the form of a stone memorial.

“The sun casts few shadows this time of day, and yet the shadows from this site extend across our city in way we cannot see with our eyes,” Salem Mayor Kim Driscoll told ABC affiliate WCVB-TV.

Inscribed with the names of 19 of the people killed at the site, the semicircular wall of stone brought comfort to some of the victims’ descendants who attended Wednesday’s ceremony.

According to WCVB, the memorial was largely funded by a $174,000 Community Preservation Act, while descendants of the victims had also contributed smaller donations.

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Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A juror who served on the 1995 O.J. Simpson criminal trial says his perception of Simpson’s innocence has changed over the years, but he ultimately stands by the not guilty verdict.

“Based off the evidence as presented in the trial … the only conclusion I can come to is not guilty,” Lon Cryer told ABC News' Nightline co-anchor Dan Harris. “It wasn't based on whether or not I really thought he did it or didn't do it… The only thing that trial did was raise reasonable doubt in my mind about whether or not he was the perpetrator or not.”

In 1995, Simpson was acquitted of the murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman in what became known as the “trial of the century.” In 1997, however, Simpson lost a wrongful death civil suit that the Goldman and Brown families brought against him, and was ordered to pay $33.5 million in damages. Simpson has always maintained he did not kill Goldman and Brown.

Watch the full story on "Nightline" Thursday at 12:35 a.m. ET

Cryer, who was juror No. 247 in the 1995 “The People vs. O.J. Simpson” criminal trial, said he now feels differently about Simpson.

“I'm probably pretty sure that he probably is the person that went over there and killed Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldberg,” he said.

Cryer said his perception changed after Simpson’s notorious book, If I Did It: Confessions of a Killer, came to light.

“I thought that was so bush league,” he said. “It became apparent to me in my mind that he was probably the person that went over there and killed those people.”

Cryer is perhaps best known as the juror who gave Simpson a black power salute -- a raised fist -- as he left the courtroom after the verdict was announced.

“It was only to say to Mr. Simpson ... ‘Hey man, enjoy your life, go back and be a real person again, because really, truthfully this was a blessing to you that we gave you here,’” Cryer said. “I wanted to try to let him know how I felt about it, really, about him and about the fact that he had been acquitted.”

Cryer is featured in a four-part series, The Jury Speaks, airing on Oxygen that takes a look at some of the major trials of our time through the jurors’ eyes and asks them to recast their verdict votes given what they know now.

Nancy Glass, the executive producer of the Oxygen series, said she believes the public is still fascinated with the Simpson case because it’s still “an unsolved mystery.”

“And it involves money, celebrity, sex, murder,” she said. “I think it will always capture our imagination even if an answer is found.”

Reflecting on big moments during the 1995 criminal trial, Cryer brought up the infamous glove experiment, in which Simpson tried on a bloody glove found at the crime scene and the glove didn’t fit. Cryer said he thought that demonstration “backfired on the prosecution.”

“It screams out to me that obviously those gloves don't fit him which means that maybe he wasn't the perpetrator of the crimes,” he said.

Simpson had put on rubber gloves before trying on the glove in court, which Cryer acknowledged would likely change how the glove fit.

“But you have to remember that the prosecution allowed that to happen,” he said.

That experiment is something Marcia Clark, the lead prosecutor in the trial, said she tried to stop from ever happening.

“I didn’t want to do it,” she told ABC News in a 2016 interview. “I knew it was a mistake … I objected. I said the latex is going to screw up the fit, they’ve shrunk, you know, I mean, I was on the record.”

Another pivotal moment in the trial was the audio tapes of LAPD Det. Mark Fuhrman, the officer who found the bloody glove and was heard the recordings using racial slurs. Hearing the Fuhrman tapes, Cryer said, was a big moment for him as a juror.

“It just it threw light on him as a perjurer in that case and of course he was a major prosecution witness,” Cryer said.

Simpson’s defense team brought the issue of race to the forefront, and they argued the LAPD had planted or contaminated evidence the prosecution presented during the trial.

“Whoever committed the crimes had bloody clothes, the bloody murder weapon, as well as bloody shoes, none of those pieces have ever been found,” Cryer said. “I don't think that the perpetrator of that crime would have been clumsy enough to drop a glove … I actually believe those pieces of evidence were planted.”

But from his perspective, Cryer said he doesn’t feel race had an impact on the resulting verdict.

“There were some people that tried to infer that the verdict was a payback for the Rodney King verdicts,” he said. “I think a lot of people thought that some of us were predisposed to decisions beforehand. I personally wasn't and I feel that none of the other jurors on the case were personally disposed to come up with a verdict other than what they would have come up with.”

The jurors were sequestered in a hotel for months throughout the trial. They weren’t allowed to watch television or read the newspaper and they were given a strict curfew every day.

“There were times where it really did feel like you were in jail. It wasn't fun at all,” Cryer said. “I believe it created a certain tension because of course it created stress for people.”

After 253 days of trial and hearing testimony from 156 witnesses, the case was finally handed over to the jury to deliberate.

“We took a straw poll and of course the straw poll came back 10-2 for acquittal and I will admit to you, the adrenaline was flying in me,” Cryer said. “I didn't lose sight of what I was supposed to do, but what it was about was I had been sequestered for 10 and a half months. I had no control over anything. When we were at the point of deliberation at this point, we as the jury have control of how much longer we're going to be here.”

After less than four hours of deliberation, the jury reached a verdict and Simpson was found not guilty. But afterward, Cryer says his first days of freedom were mired in fear.

“The night that we were released I didn't even stay at my own home. I was in fear. I wound up staying at a hotel the first night,” he said. “I had people camped out at my home in Los Angeles all the time and I had people would show up at my house and leave threatening remarks if … I answered my intercom switch and stuff.”

Simpson is currently serving a nine-to-33-year prison term for armed robbery and kidnapping after a 2007 Las Vegas hotel room confrontation over sports memorabilia. His next parole hearing is Thursday.

When he heard about Simpson's conviction for the 2007 incident, Cryer said he felt like saying, "How stupid can you be?"

"All you had to do was just stay quiet," he said. As for the sentence Simpson received for that incident, which some maintain was harsher than most for the crime, he said, “I believe that was Nevada's way of saying, ‘We're not California.'"

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iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) -- The Minneapolis Police Department has released transcripts of the 911 calls placed by a bride-to-be moments before a responding officer shot her to death.

Justine Ruszczyk, a 40-year-old Australian native, placed her first call to 911 Saturday night at 11:27 p.m. local time to report what she believed was a sexual assault occurring near her home in Minneapolis' Fulton neighborhood.

"I can hear someone out the back and I -- I'm not sure if she's having sex or being raped," Ruszczyk told the 911 operator, according to the transcript released by police.

"It's been going on for a while and I think she tried to say help and it sounds distressed," she adds.

"OK, I've already got an officer on the way," the 911 operator tells her.

Ruszczyk called 911 again about eight minutes later, expressing concern that police hadn't arrived yet.

According to the transcript, the operator answers: "911, what is the address of the emergency?"

"I just reported one but no one's here and was wondering if they got the address wrong," Ruszczyk says.

"Are you Justine?" the operator asks. "You're hearing a female screaming?"

"Yeah," Ruszczyk responds. "Yes, along behind the house."

"Yup, officers are on the way there," the operator says.

Two officers form the Minneapolis Police Department, identified by authorities as Matthew Harrity and Mohamed Noor, responded to Ruszczyk's call Saturday night.

Harrity was driving the squad car, while Noor was in the passenger seat, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety. As they neared Ruszczyk's home, Harrity indicated that he was startled by a loud sound near the car, after which Ruszczyk immediately approached the driver's side, authorities said.

Noor then fired his weapon, striking Ruszczyk through the driver's side window, which was open, the Minnesota DPS said. The officers provided medical assistance to Ruszczyk until medics arrived but she was pronounced dead at the scene, authorities said.

The Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office confirmed Monday that Ruszczyk died of a single gunshot wound to her abdomen.

Both officers have been placed on standard paid administrative leave pending the investigation. Ruszczyk's death has been ruled a homicide.

Police have launched an internal affairs review of the officers' use of force.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune said the woman was Australian and went by the name Justine Damond, using the last name of her fiance, Don Damond.

"Her maiden name was Justine Ruszczyk," the Star Tribune reported. "While the couple were not yet married, Justine referred to herself as Damond on her personal website."

Damond's website says she was a yoga instructor, a personal health and life coach and a "meditation teacher, embracing and teaching the neuro-scientific benefits of meditation."

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(Peter Houde) Jude Sparks, 10, found an animal fossil near his home in New Mexico, which is now being preserved at New Mexico State University. Peter Houde Jude Sparks, 10, found an animal fossil near his home in New Mexico, which is now being preserved at New Mexico State University. (LAS CRUCES, N.M.) -- A piece of history has been found thanks to a boy stumbling upon a rare, 1.2 million-year-old animal fossil.

In November 2016, Jude Sparks, now 10, was on an outing with his family near their New Mexico home when he tripped over what he thought was a cow skull.

Now, researchers at New Mexico State University are preserving the discovery, which was identified as a Stegomastodon -- a mastodon-like or elephant-like animal.

"I imagined through my own mind of being 9 years old and finding something like that and how incredible it would be," dad Kyle Sparks. "Like most kids, he had this really strong phase, maybe 5 or 6 years old, where he'd be reading every dinosaur and fossil book you can imagine. He's ecstatic about it."

Sparks, a father of three, said he left what to do with the fossil up to Jude, who decided he wanted to call an expert.

Sparks reached to Peter Houde, a professor at New Mexico State University, who had experience with the same type of fossil in the past.

The next day, Houde came out to see the remains for himself.

"I was real excited," Houde told ABC News. "I really like to encourage people to be aware. It was really fortuitous that this particular family did what they did. Had they tried to dig up something themselves, it really takes a great deal of technical know-how without destroying the specimen in the process. They were really responsible to try to get in touch with somebody.

"It is great for the community because now everybody can appreciate it," he added.

Houde said the university was granted permission from the landowner where the fossil was found to perform an extrication in late May.

Prior, Houde confirmed the fossil to be that of a Stegomastodon.

Houde extricated the remains of the species with his fellow faculty members and a geologist.

Houde said one of the tusks is missing from the animal, suggesting that there could be more skeleton near the site where Jude found the skull. He hopes to return to the site with geologists for an additional search, he added.

Jude and his family have been invited to visit the fossil as researchers preserve it at the university, his father said.

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Alex_Schmidt/iStock/Thinkstock(ALEXANDRIA, Va.) -- Authorities in Virginia say an arrest was made Wednesday in an apparent road-rage shooting Wednesday morning, that left a woman hospitalized and the vehicle she was driving riddled with bullets.

The Alexandria Police Department said Wednesday that Ernest Stickwell, 58, of Mechanicsville, Maryland, had been charged with malicious wounding and use of a firearm in the commission of a felony.

Authorities said he'd been taken into custody by the Maryland State Police and would, at some point, be extradited to Virginia.

Suspect arrested in Pennsylvania road rage killing Dramatic video shows alleged road rage incident on California highway

According to police, officers were called to the shooting in Alexandria around 7:56 a.m.

Police said the incident started on an interstate between the occupants of a black sport utility vehicle and another vehicle.

After the two vehicles exited the interstate, police said, they reached a stoplight. That's when, according to police, the driver of one vehicle allegedly opened fire, shattering the SUV's windows.

"Based on eyewitness testimony and interviewing the two people that were shot at, we're starting to develop a picture that indicates it was a road-rage incident," said the police department's David Huckler. "I don't know the exact circumstances that led to this shooting ... What we're concentrating on is to figure out exactly what happened in this case, discover the facts and present the case to the commonwealth attorney's office."

The SUV's driver, a 33-year-old Bladensburg, Maryland, woman, suffered gunshot wounds to her upper body. She was taken to a hospital, where she was in stable condition. Her identity had not been released. A man, who was also in the SUV, was not injured.

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ChiccoDodiFC/iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Minnesota state officials have identified the two Minneapolis Police Department officers involved in the fatal shooting of a 40-year-old Australian woman who called 911 on Saturday.

Police have launched an internal affairs review of the officers' use of force.

Here's what we know about the officers and the tragic death that took place over the weekend.

The responding officers

Matthew Harrity, who has been with the Minneapolis Police Department for a year, and Mohamed Noor, who has been with the department for 21 months, were the responding officers to the scene after Justine Maia Ruszczyk called 911 to report a possible assault near her home on Saturday, the Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS) announced in a press release Tuesday night.

Harrity was driving the squad car, while Noor was in the passenger seat. As they neared Ruszczyk's home, Harrity indicated that he was startled by a loud sound near the car, after which Ruszczyk immediately approached the driver's side, according to the Minnesota DPS.

The deadly shooting

Noor then fired his weapon, striking Ruszczyk through the driver's side window, which was open, the Minnesota DPS said. The officers provided medical assistance to Ruszczyk until EMS arrived, but she was pronounced dead at the scene.

The Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office confirmed Monday that Ruszczyk died of a single gunshot wound to her abdomen after she was shot.

Both officers have been placed on standard paid administrative leave pending the investigation. Ruszczyk's death has been ruled a homicide.

Investigators are seeking to interview a white male about 18 to 25 years old who was seen riding a bicycle in the area immediately before the shooting, according to the Minnesota DPS.

Complaints on file

ABC affiliate KSTP in Saint Paul, Minnesota, reported that Noor had at least three prior complaints on file with the department, according to city data.

Two of the complaints are still open and the other has been dismissed without disciplinary action, according to the department's Office of Police Conduct Review (OPCR), which investigates allegations of police misconduct in the city. The office did not provide information on the nature of the complaints.

The victim, a bride-to-be

The Minneapolis Star Tribune said Ruszczyk was Australian and went by the name Justine Damond, using the last name of her fiancé, Don Damond.

"Her maiden name was Justine Ruszczyk," the Star Tribune reported. "While the couple were not yet married, Justine referred to herself as Damond on her personal website."

Ruszczyk's website says the bride-to-be was a yoga instructor, a personal health and life coach and a "meditation teacher, embracing and teaching the neuro-scientific benefits of meditation."

Unanswered questions

In a statement Tuesday, Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges described Ruszczyk's death as "tragic," adding that she will continue to keep the lines of communication among officials and the public open due to interest in the case.

Harrity was interviewed by investigators Tuesday, but Noor declined to be interviewed, according to the Minnesota DPS. The Minnesota DPS Bureau of Criminal Apprehension cannot compel Noor to testify, and Noor's attorney did not provide clarification on when, if ever, an interview will take place.

"We all want answers, we all want justice to be done ... I wish he would make that statement," Hodges said at press conference Tuesday night.

However, Noor’s attorney, Tom Plunkett, issued a statement describing Noor as a caring person with a family and said he “empathizes with the loss others are experiencing.“

“The current environment for police is difficult, but Officer Noor accepts this as part of his calling,” Plunkett said in the statement. “We would like to say more, and will in the future. At this time, however, there are several investigations ongoing and Officer Noor wants to respect the privacy to the family and asks the same in return during this difficult period.”

The officers' body cameras were not turned on during the shooting, authorities said. The reason why police did not have their body cameras turned on is a "key question" for investigators, Hodges said on Good Morning America on Tuesday.

Minneapolis Police Department Assistant Chief Medaria Arradondo said at Tuesday night's press conference that the department is eight months out from fully rolling out body cameras across the force. He added that police department will soon review the body camera program.

Arradondo said the 911 call's transcript will be released after Ruszczyk's family has reviewed it.

Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau was out of the state for personal travel in the aftermath of the shooting but is cutting the trip short due to the incident, a spokesperson for the department told ABC News. She has been in constant contact with her team over the last three days, the spokesperson said.

In a statement, Harteau called the shooting "clearly a tragic death," adding that she wants to "acknowledge the pain and frustration that family and community members have."

"I also want to assure you that I understand why so many people have so many questions at this point," she said. "I have many of the same questions and it is why we immediately asked for an external and independent investigation into the officer-involved shooting death. I've asked for the investigation to be expedited to provide transparency and to answer as many questions as quickly as we can.”

On Tuesday night, Minneapolis City Council member Linea Palmisano expressed her dissatisfaction with the information released so far, describing it as "underwhelming."

The victim's family and friends speak out

While speaking to reporters in Minneapolis on Monday afternoon, Damond said his fiancée's death is a "loss to everyone who knew her."

"She touched so many people with her loving and generous heart. She was a teacher to so many and living a life of openness, love, and kindness," he said. "Our lives are forever changed as a result of knowing her. She was so kind and so darn funny ... It is difficult to fathom how to go forward without her in my life."

Ruszczyk's family has demanded more information about how she died, her fiancé said.

"We are desperate for information," Damond told reporters. "Piecing together Justine’s last moments before the homicide would be a small comfort as we grieve this tragedy."

Justine Ruszczyk's father, John Ruszczyk, said Tuesday he's struggling to understand why she died.

"We thought yesterday was our worst nightmare, but we awoke to the ugly truth and it hurt even more," John Ruszczyk told reporters. "Justine was a beacon to all of us. We only ask that the light of justice shine down on the circumstances of her death."

Family friend Julie Reed read a statement on behalf of Justine Ruszczyk's family at a press conference in Australia.

"She was treasured and loved and we will really miss her," Reed said.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- O.J. Simpson will face a Nevada parole board Thursday after serving nine years in prison for armed robbery.

Craig Arnett, a former guard at Lovelock Correctional Center in Nevada, said he got to see Simpson regularly during his first three years working at the prison. Arnett described Simpson as a model prisoner.

"He's still an inmate, but he definitely wasn't a problem child like some of the other ones were," Arnett told ABC News. "I think he has a strong chance of getting out. I think he hasn't really been a problem in prison."

The parole board's six commissioners will also consider the potential risk Simpson could pose to society should he be released. Simpson needs a majority vote of four of the six commissioners to be granted parole.

Simpson was convicted of armed robbery after he tried to steal sports memorabilia from Bruce Fromong and his friend in 2007. Simpson said he was attempting to get back his own personal memorabilia, but he was sentenced to 33 years in prison.

The former Heisman Trophy-winning football star apologized for his actions during a 2013 parole hearing.

"I didn't know I was doing anything illegal, so I'm sorry," Simpson said at the time. "I'm sorry for all of it."

Now 70, Simpson is expected to speak at his parole hearing Thursday, which will be streamed live to the public.

Fromong told ABC News that he will be speaking on Simpson's behalf.

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