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Bethany Clarke/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Twitter announced Thursday morning that it is letting go of 9 percent of its workforce, as the company reported uninspiring earnings.

Speculation has been rife in recent weeks that a number of companies were considering buying the flagging social media company.

The company's shares were up in early trading.

The cuts focus "primarily on reorganizing the company’s sales, partnerships, and marketing efforts, is intended to create greater focus and efficiency to enable Twitter’s goal of driving toward [standard accounting] profitability in 2017,” the company said in a statement.

Jack Dorsey, the company’s CEO, whose return to the company a year ago was seen as a lifeline, said, "We have a clear plan, and we’re making the necessary changes to ensure Twitter is positioned for long-term growth."

The bird-themed social network said Thursday morning that year-on quarterly revenue growth slumped to just 8 percent in the period ending Sept. 30. By comparison, year-on revenue growth last quarter was 20 percent.

The network claimed 317 million active monthly tweeters during the most recent quarter, growing 3 percent over the same time last year, a growth rate consistent with the first two quarters of this year.

Twitter is not providing revenue guidance for the fourth quarter, or the year as a whole, “because the effects of this transition could have an impact on the company’s revenue performance, there is a wider range of potential revenue outcomes,” the company said, referring to the “reorganization of the company’s sales force."

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Donald Trump's oldest children opened up about their views of the family business in light of the latest Trump hotel property that officially opened this week in Washington, D.C.

"I've been joking for a while that when we started even just this project, we said Trump was coming to Pennsylvania Avenue," Ivanka Trump, 34, told ABC News of their new hotel, which is blocks from the White House. "And we didn't even know at the time what exactly that meant."

Donald Trump Jr., 38, joked that his father was going to get to the storied neighborhood "one way or the other."

Despite reports of flagging foot traffic at Trump properties, Eric Trump said, "we have the hottest brand in the world right now."

Donald Trump reiterated Eric's sentiments, but called that a lesser concern of his right now.

"I think the brand is hotter than it's ever been,” the Republican presidential nominee said during the group's interview with ABC News' George Stephanopoulos. “But it doesn't matter to me. I don't care. It doesn't matter. I don't care about the brand. I care about the country. And fixing in this country.”

Donald Jr., Ivanka and Eric, 32, who are all senior vice presidents at The Trump Organization, told Stephanopoulos that they plan to continue to work for the company rather than the government even if their father wins the presidency. And soon, they may have another family member to add to the roster.

Tiffany Trump, 23, who just graduated from college in May, said, "of course, I'm interested" in joining the family business.

"I'm applying to law school, though, so I'd like to bring a different kind of skill set to the company,” she told Stephanopoulos. “But we'll see what happens in the future. But they work so hard and it really, really is inspiring to see.”

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Donald Trump has drawn large crowds on the campaign trail with his populist rhetoric, but the more controversial aspects of his campaign may have done more to blemish than burnish his namesake brand, some experts say.

The Republican presidential nominee took a break from the trail Wednesday to mark the opening of Trump International Hotel. Trump said at the opening ceremony that it is “with the notable exception of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue ... the most coveted piece of real estate in Washington, D.C."

The newly-opened hotel may serve as a test case for whether the brand he bestows on properties around the world may be boosted or hamstrung by his often controversial bid for the White House.

“There has never been a big separation between the corporate brand and his personal brand,” said Alfredo Fraile, managing director for the Americas at Saffron Consultants in Miami.

Fraile and other experts told ABC News that the lack of daylight between Trump the man and Trump the brand could potentially hurt his business ventures.

Trump is, “basically a personality-led brand,” said Mark Radda, a brand strategist in Cambridge, U.K. “The thing about Donald Trump is that he’s much more explicit about what the brand is, and as soon as you start changing the perceptions that people have about you, you start to change people’s perceptions about the brand.”

While political campaigns are often polarizing, Trump’s campaign has been remarkable in the controversy it has generated over the past 16 months.

“I think that people are going to be having second thoughts,” Fraile said of potential customers. “If they don’t agree with his position in terms of politics, they might think about going to one of his competitors, rather than one of his hotels.”

Fraile’s hypothesis can be backed up by data from Foursquare, a social media company that tracks users’ “check-ins” at businesses.

Earlier this month, the company reported that visits to Trump-branded hotels, casinos and golf courses in the U.S. were down 19 percent in September 2016 versus the same month in 2014.

A Trump Hotels spokesperson told Travel Leisure magazine for an Oct. 21 article that the data from Foursquare and other sources "is manipulated to appear meaningful, when, in reality, the information is inconsequential and does not provide an accurate representation of our performance."

However, the social media company’s data is supported by research done by Will Johnson at BAV Consulting, a brand research firm.

"Particularly among higher-income consumers, those making more than $150,000 to $200,000 per year, you’ve had very sharp declines in things like prestige, trust, esteem -- how highly do they regard him," Johnson told ABC News of the effects of the campaign, adding that those indicators are "the kind of key attributes for his luxury hotels, golf courses -- things that are drivers for consideration of those brands.”

“That’s the irony. The brand has historically targeted those highly-affluent consumers, and those have been most alienated by the campaign,” Johnson added.

Matt Quint, director of the Center on Global Brand Leadership at Columbia Business School in New York, said that “it’s hard to separate Trump now from the mean-spiritedness that he has had during the campaign.”

Traditionally, Quint explained, people were divided between being fans of Trump or apathetic towards him, “whereas now they are people who are actually antagonistic."

While the Trump brand may remain alluring to his supporters or those left unfazed by the bombast of election 2016, a negative result on Election Day could cause the Trump name to lose luster, according to experts interviewed by ABC News.

Sam Hornsby, managing partner at the Flamingo Group, a brand consultancy in New York, said that the GOP presidential nominee has eroded the Trump brand equity -- the value derived from brand perception.

“What you have here now are changing equities from things like ‘success,' ‘performance’ and ‘winning' to the inclusion of new associations such as ‘scandal,' ‘bigotry’ and -- depending on the outcome of Nov. 8 -- actually ‘losing.' So, the overall impression of the brand in terms of its equities has actually changed through this campaign,” Hornsby said.

And if he were to lose on Election Day, the brand could suffer even worse.

“The [Trump] name itself means essentially to win something over someone,” he said. “If you look at the way the election is playing out now, where there’s a potential scenario for the meaning of the word to become completely inverted, we can see a situation where ‘to get Trumped’ means to lose significantly.”

If Trump loses the election, there's even a possibility that the phrase becomes an Internet meme on sites like Urban Dictionary or on social media, Hornsby said.

“Through the campaign, he’s brought all of his personal quirks and eccentricities to the Trump brand. And as a result, that has made the brand more personal, and therefore more susceptible to consumer scrutiny,” he explained. “Before, it stood with something a little more abstract -- perhaps a lifestyle.”

If Trump’s brand does indeed become tarnished, it could hit his bottom line, experts said.

“Globally, licensing his brand in the future is going to be a challenge,” Quint said. “I’d be surprised if he’s as successful in the future.”

But the experts also said that Trump could still remain a very successful businessman even if he were to lose the election.

“A lot of his supporters are going to buy into the idea that the election was ‘rigged,' so they’re not going to see him as a loser now," Quint said. "He was cheated out of success, they’ll think.”

Depending on what Trump does after the election, there's an opportunity "for the Trump Brand, and for his children running the brand, to become something new if Donald Trump chooses to step away from being a massive personal brand on the media landscape,” Quint added.

Radda, the U.K.-based brand consultant, said that if Trump were to lose the election and his brand were to suffer, he would “need to look at whether he should tone down the way his brands are named -- whether the Trump name should be so prominent.”

Hornsby agreed, saying that one solution would be to create sub-brands under the Trump umbrella.

The seeds for that may already have been sowed.

Late last month, the Trump Organization announced a new brand for a collection of properties around the globe: Scion, "which means ‘descendant of a notable family,'" the announcement said.

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Zoonar/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Hollywood and Halloween have long gone hand in hand, with popular costumes inspired by some of Hollywood's top box office hits and celebrities over the past three decades.

Back in 1983, Princess Leia's iconic gold bikini captured the attention of everyone who saw Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, and immediately became a hot Halloween costume of choice.

One year later, the horror film A Nightmare on Elm Street produced one of Hollywood’s, and Halloween’s, most frightful characters: mass murderer Freddy Krueger.

In 1988, costumers donned long black wigs in a nod to horror hostess Elvira in the comedy Elvira: Mistress of the Dark.

The early '90s prompted kids to kick butt and dress like their favorite TV show counterparts from Sailor Moon, Power Rangers and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

From glow-in-the-dark to streaked with blood, variations of the mask from Scream went on the market after the film hit theaters in 1996.

Star Wars made a comeback in 1999, after Natalie Portman’s portrayal of the young Queen Amidala in Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace.

By the millennium, everyone wore velour suits and said, “Yeah baby,” as the second Austin Powers film, The Spy Who Shagged Me, boosted the character’s popularity.

Scallywag Captain Jack Sparrow made his film debut in 2003’s Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl and out on the streets on Halloween.

Lady Gaga’s over the top looks, from her music videos to her walks on the red carpet, gave costumers lots to choose from as they channeled their inner "monster" and her unique apparel in 2010.

MTV's hit reality show Jersey Shore, led to a "GTL" (Gym Tan Laundry) themed 2011. Fans of the show emulated Snooki, Mike “The Situation” and the rest of the crew.

Disney princesses and other characters have long been represented by little kids on Halloween, and 2014 saw an incredible amount of Frozen-inspired Princess Anna and Princess Elsa costumes.

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Pinkypills/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Samsung is promising to climb out of the financial doldrums after being rocked by a crisis over the fiery Note7 smartphone.

In financial filings made public on Wednesday, the company revealed that its third quarter (ending Sept. 30) profit was down 30 percent year-on-year, "due to the Galaxy Note7 discontinuation,” as well as the strength of the South Korean currency relative to other currencies.

The company made about $4.57 billion USD in profit this quarter.  That was down from about $6.49 billion during the same period last year.

The company vowed to make a comeback.

"Regarding the mobile business, the company will focus on expanding sales of new flagship products with differentiated design and innovative features, as well as regaining consumers’ confidence,” the company said in a statement released on Wednesday night.

The company dispelled concerns that concerns over the safety of the Note7 may have negatively affected sales of other (safe) models, saying that non-Note7 sales remained solid.

"The Mobile business saw its earnings decrease significantly [quarter over quarter] due to the effects of the discontinuation of the Galaxy Note7,” it said. "However, smartphone shipments remained solid due to continued stable sales of its existing flagship devices, including the Galaxy S7 and S7 edge, and steady growth in the mid-tier Galaxy A and J series."

Among other strategies, the company said it would focus on achieving “solid” earnings growth in 2017 through "through normalization of the mobile business.”

"The mobile business expects a recovery in its earnings to a similar level with that of the fourth quarter of 2015, led by solid sales of the Galaxy S7 and S7 edge,” the company said.

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Don Emmert/Getty Images(NEW YORK) – Microsoft unveiled a number of new products at an event in New York City on Thursday.

The company rolled out a new Surface Book computer, calling it “the ultimate laptop” in addition to a whole new Microsoft PC called the Surface Studio.

The desktop computer, meant for professionals, features what the company says is the thinnest LCD monitor ever built. It also has an aluminum enclosure and touch-screen capabilities.

The company says “limited quantities” of the Surface Studio will be available for the holiday shopping season.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- It’s a joke Donald Trump has made often.

"I always said I'm getting to Pennsylvania Avenue one way or another, so here I have!" Trump said in Sanford, Florida on Tuesday.

Indeed, on Wednesday he left his run-through of battleground states for a stop in the city where he hopes to reside. He officially opened his new hotel, Trump International, in an old post office in Washington D.C.

"Today is a metaphor for what we can accomplish for this country. Same kind of thing. This building is a historical landmark, a true American original. It had all of the ingredients of greatness, but it had been neglected and left to deteriorate for many, many decades," Trump said, flanked by his three eldest children.

It is yet another example of the Republican nominee mixing business with presidential -- a phenomenon becoming more common as the election nears its close.

The hotel opening in the nation's capital had not been billed as a campaign event -- technically he was there as the owner. But Trump couldn’t help reverting to campaigning, at times lapsing into his stump speech, attacking Obamacare and the underfunding of the Department of Veteran’s Affairs.

The mix has gone both ways.

On Tuesday, the campaign hastily summoned the press to Trump National Doral golf course near Miami, Florida. Trump took the stage and began to tout the architecture of the course.

"So we are very proud of this," he said. "We could have renovated the inexpensive way with paint, but instead we ripped it down to the steel, rebuilt Doral. Even if you look at the ballroom, that's a brand new ballroom that didn't exist. We took it down to the absolute steel."

At the event, Trump was flanked by employees who took the stage when called to deliver glowing reports about the Republican nominee. As the multicultural group spoke, Trump joked with one employee, "This guy better say good or else I’ll say 'You’re fired,' I’ll say, 'Who is that guy?'"

A Latino employee said that it was an honor to work for Trump and that he supports him completely.

"And I didn’t pay you to say that right?" Trump said. But, of course, since the man is an employee, Trump had.

Trump was also eager to remind everyone there that before he was a politician, he was a businessman. If the election doesn't go his way, he'll be one after Nov. 8, as well.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Has an airline ever lost your baggage? Now there may be a new way to make sure your checked bags make it to your destination when you do.  

Delta is developing new tracking technology that will allow you to follow your baggage through the company’s mobile app. Watch the video below to learn more.

ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos

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Apple(CUPERTINO, Calif.) — Apple’s profits are on the decline. Despite the introduction of the company’s iPhone 7, Apple posted a 3 percent loss in the last quarter.

Watch the video below for more.

ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- For the fifth time in nine years, Taco Bell will be giving out a free taco next week thanks to a stolen base by Cleveland Indians shortstop Francisco Lindor Tuesday night.

Lindor stole the base during the first inning of Game 1 of the World Series against the Chicago Cubs. The Indians went on to win the game 6-0.

According to Taco Bell's deal, if a base is stolen in Game 1 or 2, free Doritos Locos tacos will be given away on Nov. 2 between 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. If there are any bases stolen in the remaining games of the World Series, the free tacos will be handed out on Nov. 10.

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(COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.) – Uber’s autonomous truck company says it just completed the world’s first commercial shipment by self-driving truck.

Otto, which was recently acquired by Uber, partnered with Anheuser-Busch to deliver 2,000 cases of Budweiser Beer from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs, a distance of 120 miles.

The company says while a human loaded the cargo into the truck, he just sat in the cab while the truck itself did all the driving on the interstate. Once back on local roads, the driver took control the rest of the way.

Uber is exploring potential partnerships with other companies to participate in a program it’s calling Uber Freight.

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Erik Von Weber/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The new nightly Facebook Live show that Trump advisers have launched ahead of the final two weeks of the campaign may signal a foray into a formal media presence, but the transition from political campaign to cable news show — or even channel — has been tried before, without great success.

When asked if the live show, dubbed "Trump Tower Live," was a precursor or test case for a larger, post-election media operation, Trump communications adviser Cliff Sims said, "This effort is a result of conversations that took place inside the communications team on how to best utilize Mr. Trump's massive online platforms to reach people with his message."

For his part, Trump has denied any post-election aspirations of becoming a media mogul.

"No, I have no interest in Trump TV. I hear it all over the place. I have a tremendous fan base, we have a tremendous base. We have the most incredible people, but I just don’t have any interest in that. I have one interest – that’s on Nov. 8,” Trump said in an interview with Cincinnati’s 700WLW Tuesday morning.

Speculation about the ultimate goal of the show — and whether it could be the first iteration of some form of Trump TV — has been fueled by reports that Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner has had conversations about possibly forming a media property, though that has not been confirmed by the campaign.

The involvement of several right-wing media players — most notably, former Breitbart executive chairman turned Trump campaign CEO Steve Bannon and Fox News founder and Trump adviser Roger Ailes — gives some credence to the possibility.

Thomas Patterson, a professor at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, said that "someone like a Trump kind of fits the profile as someone who could" try to launch a media company of sorts after an election if he doesn't win, but it's a hard journey ahead if that's the case.

"There's lots of obstacles to this thing. It's easier said than done," he said, noting that a number of failed presidential candidates have tried similar moves.

Patterson cited Ross Perot and Pat Robertson as early examples of failed candidates who tried to create a media-based enterprise after their presidential bids. A more recent example is Al Gore, a founder of the now defunct Current TV.

"One of the big challenges for any new outlet is the way cable is structured and what kind of placement you're going to get. They don't have to carry you, and they don't have to give you any priority. Gore ran into that," Patterson said. "He was so far down the list."

"There's lots of problems, and it takes a lot of money. And my sense is that you're talking about hundreds of millions of dollars, and you have to get that somewhere," Patterson added.

Sims said that Trump campaign officials see the Facebook Live show as simply an opportunity to have more impact on voters before Nov. 8.

"Frankly, it would be malpractice for the rest of the campaign not to look for ways" to use Trump's social media presence to communicate to voters, Sims said.

"It started with just doing his rallies, and so it kind of morphed from there," he said.

The campaign's live show, which didn't have an official name at the time, made a splash the night of the third debate between Hillary Clinton and Trump, in Las Vegas, where Sims and Trump surrogate Boris Epshteyn hosted pre- and post-debate discussions that were streamed on Facebook and featured on a revamped Trump campaign website.

At the show's peak that night, there were 200,000 concurrent viewers, and it has been watched more than 9 million times, Sims said.

During last night's inaugural broadcast of "Trump Tower Live," Sims said, the show received more than 200,000 Facebook comments during the broadcast, and it has been viewed more than 1.4 million times.

"Trump Tower Live," which is recorded in Trump's building in midtown Manhattan, is set to air every night through the Nov. 8 election, with the start time and program length depending on the candidate's schedule every evening.

The guests will rotate, with Sims saying staffers plan to "take advantage of our resources and surrogates that are here in the building to advance whatever Mr. Trump's message of the day is."

One such surrogate tonight will reportedly be former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

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FREDERIC J BROWN/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Working to repair its brand after a false account scandal over the past several weeks, Wells Fargo launched a television ad campaign on Monday complete with its historic horse-drawn wagons and pledges to address customer concerns.

The ads are the company’s latest effort to reassure the public after regulators said in early September that its employees had opened as many as two million credit and deposit accounts without clients’ knowledge or permission.

Evocative of the company’s brand, one 30-second ad opens with a slow-motion shot of horses pulling a carriage across a prairie -- the iconic Wells Fargo wagon -- while piano music plays.

A female narrator says, "Wells Fargo is making changes to make things right," before listing the measures the company has taken to stem the damage from the scandal.

The television ads, which supplement a current digital and print campaign, began airing Monday night on ABC's World News Tonight and competing newscasts at NBC and CBS, a bank spokesman, Mark Folk, told ABC News. The spots will also run on Sunday morning talk shows.

Folk declined to disclose the bank's budget or planned length of time for its appeal to the public through TV ads.

The campaign comes about two weeks after embattled former CEO John Stumpf announced his retirement and the company's board selected Tim Sloan to replace him.

Upon taking the mantle, Sloan said his "immediate and highest priority is to restore trust in Wells Fargo."

Sloan appears to have his work cut out for him. In data released alongside its third-quarter earnings earlier this month, the bank revealed that September customer visits to branch bankers had fallen 10 percent compared to September 2015. They were also down 14 percent versus August of this year.

Perhaps more alarming for those at the top was the revelation that consumer checking account openings in September were down 30 percent versus the previous month and 25 percent year over year.

The company's campaign to repair its image began earlier this month, Folk said, with digital and print advertisements running in local and national papers. Those ads are ongoing.

The introduction of the TV spots comes ahead of planned advertisements in Spanish-language media, including La Opinion, targeted to the Latino community in Los Angeles, on Oct. 27. TV spots with Spanish narration and titling on Telemundo and Univision are due to arrive on Oct. 31, Folk said.

Wells Fargo will also place ads in the World Journal starting on Oct. 27, and in the South Asian Times a day after.

Radio ads will begin on Oct. 31 on Radio One, a network of 55 stations in 16 markets across the U.S. that targets African American and urban listeners, according to the network’s website.

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Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- If you're a fan of Girl Scout cookies, you'll soon be able to enjoy them in cereal form.

The Star Tribune reports General Mills is partnering with the Girl Scouts to create two cookie-flavored cereals: Thin Mints and Caramel Crunch, which appears to be inspired by Samoas.

The boxes of cereal will hit store shelves in January, according to the Minneapolis newspaper, and will only be available for a limited time.

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Insurance Institute for Highway Safety(WASHINGTON) — Owners of the top-selling pickup truck in the United States may be disappointed that it was among the poorest performers in a recent test of headlight effectiveness.

The number one seller, Ford's F-150, received multiple "poor" ratings on both its halogen and LED headlights in the new study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, an independent nonprofit research and communications organization. The study looked at the effectiveness of the headlights in 11 different 2016 and 2017 models of pickups.

Only one pickup truck, the 2017 Honda Ridgeline, earned a top rating of "good."

Ford was quick to note that while the F-150's headlights did not receive a positive rating in this study, the truck continues to get top ratings in safety overall.

"Safety continues to be one of the highest priorities in the design of our vehicles. In addition to being the only 2016 [Insurance Institute for Highway Safety] Top Safety Pick among full-size pickup trucks, F-150 has also earned the federal government’s highest 5-star overall safety rating," Ford said in a statement to ABC News.

Pickup trucks are the latest focus of a larger study of headlight safety by the institute, which looked at the same feature in midsize cars and small sport utility vehicles earlier this year.

The institute "launched its headlight ratings after finding that government standards based on laboratory tests allow for huge variation in the amount of illumination headlights provide in on-road driving," a press release from the organization said.

Federal regulations require a certain amount of light to be projected from the headlights, but there is no standard for how far the light must reach.

A senior research engineer for the highway safety group told ABC News that the findings of its headlight tests so far aren't good.

“Unfortunately, the new results that we’re releasing [on pickup trucks] are consistent with results that we have been seeing” with other vehicles, the institute engineer, Matthew Brumbelow, said. “Across the board, we’re seeing very few headlights that have good or acceptable ratings.”

In its study of pickups, the group's engineers measured how far light is projected from a vehicle's low beams and high beams as the truck travels straight and on curves.

The amount of glare from low beams for oncoming drivers was also measured.

Among the 11 pickup models evaluated, there were 23 possible headlight combinations, including LED, high-intensity discharge, and halogen projectors and reflectors in both the low-beam and high-beam type. A vehicle's high-beam assist was also taken into account.

Although most of the headlights evaluated were deemed unsatisfactory, there is some good news. Brumbelow said just changing how headlights are installed can improve their performance.

“Aiming [of the headlights] is important,” he told ABC News.

He said that already, in response to the institute's earlier studies of headlights, “A lot of manufacturers have gone back to the factory to change that aim to get it where it needs to be.”

Regardless of a car’s headlight rating, the institute encourages drivers to use their high beams as often as possible when other drivers aren’t around.

Larger pickups in the study included the 2016 Ram 1500, the 2017 Honda Ridgeline, the 2017 Nissan Titan, and the 2016 and 2017 models of the GMC Sierra, the Chevrolet Silverado, the Ford F-150 and the Toyota Tundra.

Smaller pickups evaluated included the 2016 models of the Chevrolet Colorado, the GMC Canyon and the Nissan Frontier and the 2016 and 2017 versions of the Toyota Tacoma.

The top performer: Honda's 2017 Ridgeline got the highest rating, thanks to its LED projector low beams, which provided "fair to good visibility on most approaches, with inadequate visibility only on the gradual left curve," the report said. High-beam assist, a feature that automatically switches on high beams if no other vehicles are nearby, makes up for some of the deficiencies of the low beams, the report added. High-beam assist is on several of the models tested.

The catch? The only Ridgeline model with "good" headlights is also the most expensive version of the model. Buy a cheaper version without the bells and whistles, and the headlight rating falls to "poor."

The Middle Ground:

The GMC Sierra is the only truck with a moderately positive rating of "acceptable" -- but only on certain versions of the car. For some versions, the Sierra earned poor ratings -- specifically, with its high-intensity discharge projector headlights. GM declined to comment about these results to ABC News.

Both Halogen and LED headlights available on the Nissan Titan earned a "marginal" rating.

GM, which makes the GMC Sierra, Chevy Silverado, Chevrolet Colorado, and GMC Canyon, declined to comment on the report.

Nissan told ABC News in a statement that safety continues to be one of the highest priorities in the design of its vehicles.

"In the spirit of continuous improvement, Nissan evaluates all independent test results and will seek to use them to make product improvements wherever possible," the company said.

Meanwhile, only the halogen reflector headlights on the Ram 1500 earned a "marginal" rating; the halogen projector headlights Ram 1500 headlights earned a "poor" rating.

Ram 1500 maker Fiat Chrysler Automobiles also released a statement to ABC News about the study's findings, saying that the one test does not determine overall vehicle safety.

"This is a new test with specific benchmarks that don’t align with regulatory requirements. FCA US vehicles meet or exceed all applicable federal motor-vehicle safety standards," the company statement said, adding that it will continue to evaluate the safety performance of its vehicles.

The Worst Performers:

All of the small pickup trucks evaluated by institute received poor ratings on headlights.

Additionally, the headlights of the 2016 and 2017 models of the Chevy Silverado, the Ford F-150 and the Toyota Tundra all received poor ratings -- something that some automakers were clearly not happy about.

"The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) periodically develops new, more specialized tests that go beyond federal requirements, which all Toyota vehicles meet," Toyota released in a statement to ABC News.

"The Institute’s new vehicle headlight assessment is the latest such test. It sets a more stringent glare criteria than what is required by the federal standard," Toyota continued. "We are evaluating the results for Toyota and Lexus models and will need to determine the appropriate aiming tolerance for each model’s headlight system in order to balance the test protocol’s criteria for down-the-road lighting performance and the amount of glare to drivers of oncoming vehicles."
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